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Do Government Wage Cuts Close Budget Deficits? a Conceptual Framework for Developing Countries and Transition Economies


  • International Monetary Fund


Real wage declines have been common in the public sector in many countries over substantial periods of time. In several cases, such wage reductions have coincided with a decline in the efficiency of the public sector. In a simple analytical framework, it is shown that higher wage levels alter the incentive compatible equilibrium by attracting relatively skilled human capital to the government sector, which raises the quality of public output--tax revenue collection in this paper. Increases in wages should be complemented with appropriate monitoring and penalty rates for effective tax administration; prescriptions of raising the statutory tax rate alone, however, may not increase revenue collection.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 1996. "Do Government Wage Cuts Close Budget Deficits? a Conceptual Framework for Developing Countries and Transition Economies," IMF Working Papers 96/19, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:96/19

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Stanley & Sahay, Ratna & Vegh, Carlos, 1998. "From transition to market: Evidence and growth prospects," MPRA Paper 20615, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Litina, Anastasia & Palivos, Theodore, 2016. "Corruption, tax evasion and social values," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 164-177.
    3. Fischer, Stanley & Sahay, Ratna & Vegh, Carlos, 1998. "How far is Eastern Europe from Brussels?," MPRA Paper 20059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Johannes Fedderke & Robert Klitgaard & Kamil Akramov, 2011. "Heterogeneity Happens: How Rights Matter in Economic Development," Working Papers 220, Economic Research Southern Africa.

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