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Military Expenditure and Arms Trade; Alternative Data Sources

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  • John Wakeman-Linn
  • Nancy Louise Happe

Abstract

Analysis of the economic impact of military expenditures and arms trade is frequently hampered by the limited amount of transparent, comprehensive data. Country-specific information can be supplemented, however, by data from multicountry statistical sources. This paper describes seven publications which provide multicountry statistics on military expenditure and trade--the information each source conveys, as well as the differences in coverage and definition--to assist the analyst in understanding how to use this data. Comparisons of the data reported by the various sources reveal numerous, significant differences, particularly in data on military expenditures.

Suggested Citation

  • John Wakeman-Linn & Nancy Louise Happe, 1994. "Military Expenditure and Arms Trade; Alternative Data Sources," IMF Working Papers 94/69, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:94/69
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    2. Peter S. Heller, 1998. "Rethinking Public Pension Reform Initiatives," IMF Working Papers 98/61, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1995. "Resisting Migration: Wage Rigidity and Income Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 312-316, May.
    4. Richard Hemming, 1998. "Should Public Pensions be Funded?," IMF Working Papers 98/35, International Monetary Fund.
    5. David E. Wildasin, 1994. "Income Redistribution and Migration," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 637-656, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2006. "Military expenditure, threats, and growth," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 129-155.

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