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The Internationalization of Yen and Key Currency Questions

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  • Toru Iwami

Abstract

The role of the yen in the International financial system is reconsidered from a comparative (historical) approach. Compared with the D-Mark in the postwar years, the limited use of the yen results not so much from regulations on capital movements as from the structure and behavior of Japanese economy. The history of the pound-sterling and the U.S. dollar reveals the fact that such factors as the network of foreign trade and economic size constitute the basis and “inertia” of a key-currency. Thus for a currency to rise to a key-position in global transactions, real factors are more decisive than financial market arrangement. Seen from the foreign economic relations, it is not possible for Japan to own a key-currency independent from the U.S. dollar.

Suggested Citation

  • Toru Iwami, 1994. "The Internationalization of Yen and Key Currency Questions," IMF Working Papers 94/41, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:94/41
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Meissner, Christopher M. & Oomes, Nienke, 2009. "Why do countries peg the way they peg? The determinants of anchor currency choice," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 522-547.
    2. Hartmann, Philipp, 1998. "The Currency Denomination of World Trade after European Monetary Union," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 424-454, December.

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