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Fixed or Floating Exchange Regimes; Does it Matter for Inflation?

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  • Peter J. Quirk

Abstract

This paper reviews recent experience with the choice of floating or fixed (“anchor”) exchange regimes in industrial and developing countries. It concludes that desirable differences between the two sets of regimes have narrowed, owing to the useful operational role of exchange rate margins and unavoidable medium-term rate adjustments in the context of fixed regimes. A survey of recent empirical cross-country literature also suggests little unambiguous association of the choice of exchange regime with macroeconomic performance, inflation in particular. Stability of the exchange rate has generally been a by-product of other policy choices. Even announcement effects of the regime on inflation-fighting credibility depend on the country-specific assignments of policy instruments to more than one institution--central bank, government, or regional and multilateral institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Quirk, 1994. "Fixed or Floating Exchange Regimes; Does it Matter for Inflation?," IMF Working Papers 94/134, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:94/134
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    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Groeneveld & Kees Koedijk & Clemens Kool, 1998. "Credibility of European economic convergence," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 134(1), pages 1-24, March.
    2. Yin-Wong Cheung & Dickson C. Tam & Matthew S. Yiu, 2008. "Does the Chinese interest rate follow the US interest rate?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 53-67.
    3. Levy Yeyati, Eduardo & Sturzenegger, Federico & Reggio, Iliana, 2010. "On the endogeneity of exchange rate regimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(5), pages 659-677, July.
    4. Kocenda, Evzen, 2005. "Beware of breaks in exchange rates: Evidence from European transition countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 307-324, September.
    5. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Yuen, Jude, 2002. "Effects of U.S. Inflation on Hong Kong and Singapore," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 603-619, September.
    6. M S Mohanty & Marc Klau, 2001. "What determines inflation in emerging market economies?," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Modelling aspects of the inflation process and the monetary transmission mechanism in emerging market countries, volume 8, pages 1-38 Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Richard N. Cooper, 1999. "Exchange rate choices," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 43(Jun), pages 99-136.
    8. Fasano-Filho, Ugo, 1996. "Economic policy making in sub-Saharan Africa and IMF involvement," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(Supplemen), pages 115-151.
    9. Rumen Dobrinsky, 1996. "Monetary policy, macroeconomic adjustment and currency speculation under floating exchange rates: the case of Bulgaria," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(1), pages 185-210, May.

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