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Savings, Investment, and Growth in Eastern Europe

Author

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  • Peter J Montiel
  • Eduardo Borensztein

Abstract

Even modest investment rates may achieve satisfactory rates of growth in the reforming economies of Eastern Europe because their relative capital scarcity implies high rates of productivity for capital. The most serious obstacle to private investment is uncertainty about the reform process, which can potentially rule out all but the most profitable projects. This problem sharply increases the payoff from accelerating the structural reform process. Regarding savings, critical aspects are the changes in methods of financing resulting from economic reform, and the availability of foreign savings, both in the form of loans and foreign direct investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J Montiel & Eduardo Borensztein, 1991. "Savings, Investment, and Growth in Eastern Europe," IMF Working Papers 91/61, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:91/61
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2004. "Does Macroeconomic Policy Affect Private Savings in Europe?: Evidence from a Dynamic Panel Data Model," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 431, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Gabrisch, Hubert & Buscher, Herbert S., 2005. "The unemployment-growth relationship in transition countries," IWH Discussion Papers 5/2005, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    3. Robert Holzmann, 1993. "Reforming old-age pensions systems in Central and Eastern European countries in transition," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 191-218, December.
    4. Abdur R Chowdhury, 2004. "Private Savings in Transition Economies: Are there Terms of Trade Shocks?," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 46(4), pages 487-514, December.
    5. Cevdet Denizer & Holger C. Wolf, 1998. "Household Savings in Transition Economies," NBER Working Papers 6457, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Nauro F. Campos, 1999. "Back to the Future: The Growth Prospects of Transition Economies Reconsidered," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp146, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    7. Marek Dabrowski, 1999. "Disinflation, Monetary Policy and Fiscal Constraints. Experience of the Countries in Transition," CASE Network Reports 0016, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Hubert Gabrisch & Herbert Buscher, 2006. "The Relationship between Unemployment and Output in Post-communist Countries," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 261-276.
    9. Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2002. "Back on Track?: Savings Puzzles in EU-Accession Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 306, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2003. "Private Savings in Eastern European EU-Accession Countries: Evidence from a Dynamic Panel Data Model," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 372, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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