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Do Exchange Rates Work? Another View


  • Robert A. Mundell


This paper investigates the role of exchange rates in balance of payments theories. It explores the sixteen approaches to the balance of payments, the concept of an “equilibrium” trade balance and sequential “stages” of the current account. It examines fiscal and demographic influences on the U.S. deficit. The final section considers the breakdown of the international monetary system after World Wars I and II; an evaluation of alternative proposals to correct the defects of the system; and an examination of the extent to which deficits of reserve countries have their origins in systemic problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert A. Mundell, 1991. "Do Exchange Rates Work? Another View," IMF Working Papers 91/37, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:91/37

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Canice Prendergast, 1999. "The Provision of Incentives in Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 7-63, March.
    2. Dhillon, Amrita & Lockwood, Ben, 2004. "When are plurality rule voting games dominance-solvable?," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 55-75, January.
    3. John Ferejohn, 1986. "Incumbent performance and electoral control," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 5-25, January.
    4. Mirman, Leonard J & Samuelson, Larry & Urbano, Amparo, 1993. "Monopoly Experimentation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(3), pages 549-563, August.
    5. Wittman, Donald, 1989. "Why Democracies Produce Efficient Results," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1395-1424, December.
    6. Gibbons, Robert & Waldman, Michael, 1999. "Careers in organizations: Theory and evidence," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 36, pages 2373-2437 Elsevier.
    7. Mathias Dewatripont & Ian Jewitt & Jean Tirole, 1999. "The Economics of Career Concerns, Part II: Application to Missions and Accountability of Government Agencies," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 199-217.
    8. le Borgne, E. & Lockwood, B., 2000. "Do Elections Always Motivate Incumbents?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 580, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Kihangire, 2005. "The Effects Of Exchange Rate Variability On Exports: Evidence From Uganda (1988 – 2001)," International Trade 0505013, EconWPA.
    2. Ott, Mack, 1996. "Post Bretton Woods deviations from purchasing power parity in G7 exchange rates--an empirical exploration," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 899-924, December.
    3. Stanisic, Nenad, 2012. "Effects of international monetary integration on inflation, economic growth and current account," MPRA Paper 38938, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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