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Coping with Falling Oil Prices: The Different Fortunes of African Banks

Author

Listed:
  • Cheikh A. Gueye
  • Asithandile Mbelu
  • Amadou N Sy

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of declining oil prices on banks in sub-Saharan African oil-exporting countries. Results indicate that banks respond differently to an oil shock depending on their ownership: (i) domestic banks are the most adversely impacted and experience a deterioration in asset quality and liquidity; (ii) foreign-owned banks are the most resilient as they are able to improve asset quality and attract deposits but at the same time, they decelerate credit growth; in contrast, (iii) Pan-African Banks help stabilize overall credit but large banks in that segment experience reduced asset quality. These differentiated results suggest a tradeoff between maintaining credit growth and safeguarding financial stability in an oil slump which could be addressed by both micro- and macroprudential policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheikh A. Gueye & Asithandile Mbelu & Amadou N Sy, 2019. "Coping with Falling Oil Prices: The Different Fortunes of African Banks," IMF Working Papers 19/129, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:19/129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Isha Agrawal & Rupa Duttagupta & Andrea F Presbitero, 2017. "International Commodity Prices and Domestic Bank Lending in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 17/279, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Deaton, Angus & Miller, Ron, 1996. "International Commodity Prices, Macroeconomic Performance and Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 5(3), pages 99-191, October.
    3. Robert Cull & Maria Soledad Martinez Peria & Jeanne Verrier, 2017. "Bank Ownership; Trends and Implications," IMF Working Papers 17/60, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Leonardo Gambacorta & David Marques‐Ibanez, 2011. "The bank lending channel: lessons from the crisis," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(66), pages 135-182, April.
    5. Markus Brückner & Antonio Ciccone, 2010. "International Commodity Prices, Growth and the Outbreak of Civil War in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 519-534, May.
    6. Miyajima Ken, 2017. "An Empirical Investigation of Oil-Macro-financial Linkages in Saudi Arabia," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-15, August.
    7. Ken Miyajima, 2017. "What Influences Bank Lending in Saudi Arabia?," IMF Working Papers 17/31, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    9. Tidiane Kinda & Montfort Mlachila & Rasmané Ouedraogo, 2016. "Commodity Price Shocks and Financial Sector Fragility," IMF Working Papers 16/12, International Monetary Fund.
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