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Structural Reforms and External Rebalancing

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  • Alexander Culiuc
  • Annette J Kyobe

Abstract

Empirical research on structural reforms has focused primarily on their impact on growth and productivity. Yet an often-invoked rationale for structural reforms is their impact on external adjustment. This paper finds little evidence that structural reforms improve the current account in the short run, but they can increase the responsiveness and resilience of the economy to external shocks. In particular, elasticities of exports with respect to the real effective exchange rate increase with some structural indicators, suggesting that structural reforms facilitate the reallocation of resources to the tradable sector in response to a negative external shock. The paper concludes that structural reforms, while not having an immediate positive impact on the current account balance, can be an important complement to traditional macroeconomic adjustment.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Culiuc & Annette J Kyobe, 2017. "Structural Reforms and External Rebalancing," IMF Working Papers 17/182, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:17/182
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
    5. Luis M. Cubeddu & Alexander Culiuc & Ghada Fayad & Yuan Gao & Kalpana Kochhar & Annette J Kyobe & Ceyda Oner & Roberto Perrelli & Sarah Sanya & Evridiki Tsounta & Zhongxia Zhang, 2014. "Emerging Markets in Transition; Growth Prospects and Challenges," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 14/6, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Gregory, Allan W. & Head, Allen C., 1999. "Common and country-specific fluctuations in productivity, investment, and the current account," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 423-451, December.
    7. Hausmann, Ricardo & Klinger, Bailey, 2006. "Structural Transformation and Patterns of Comparative Advantage in the Product Space," Working Paper Series rwp06-041, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    8. Cacciatore, Matteo & Duval, Romain & Fiori, Giuseppe & Ghironi, Fabio, 2016. "Short-term pain for long-term gain: Market deregulation and monetary policy in small open economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 358-385.
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    10. Duval, Romain, 2008. "Is there a role for macroeconomic policy in fostering structural reforms? Panel evidence from OECD countries over the past two decades," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 491-502, June.
    11. Thierry Tressel & Shengzu Wang & Joong S Kang & Jay C Shambaugh & Jörg Decressin & Petya Koeva Brooks, 2014. "Adjustment in Euro Area Deficit Countries; Progress, Challenges, and Policies," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 14/7, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Luis M. Cubeddu & Signe Krogstrup & Gustavo Adler & Pau Rabanal & Mai Chi Dao & Swarnali A Hannan & Luciana Juvenal & Carolina Osorio Buitron & Cyril Rebillard & Daniel Garcia-Macia & Callum Jones & J, 2019. "The External Balance Assessment Methodology: 2018 Update," IMF Working Papers 19/65, International Monetary Fund.

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