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Trilemma or Dilemma; Inspecting the Heterogeneous Response of Local Currency Interest Rates to Foreign Rates

Author

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  • Luca A Ricci
  • Wei Shi

Abstract

This paper studies the heterogeneous response across countries of local currency interest rates to foreign and domestic factors, thus contributing to the discussion on the policy trilemma in international economics. On average, floaters appear to be less affected by the U.S. in the short run (up to about one year). However, there is large cross-country heterogeneity in the response: floaters that care less about domestic objectives, exhibit stronger fear of floating, or show higher co-cyclicality with the U.S., respond more to foreign rates. This suggests that floating does not necessarily imply a lack of response of local policy rates to foreign ones, but seems to allow independence when needed. Moreover, the effect of foreign rates on the short end of the local interest rate curve seems to operate mainly via the foreign influence on local policy rates, thus suggesting that central banks may be themselves the source of conduit of the “global credit cycle” discussed by Rey (2014). At the same time, most countries face the equivalent of a “Greenspan conundrum” as their long term rates are mainly influenced by foreign factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca A Ricci & Wei Shi, 2016. "Trilemma or Dilemma; Inspecting the Heterogeneous Response of Local Currency Interest Rates to Foreign Rates," IMF Working Papers 16/75, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:16/75
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maurice Obstfeld & Jay C. Shambaugh & Alan M. Taylor, 2005. "The Trilemma in History: Tradeoffs Among Exchange Rates, Monetary Policies, and Capital Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 423-438, August.
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    3. Michael W. Klein & Jay C. Shambaugh, 2015. "Rounding the Corners of the Policy Trilemma: Sources of Monetary Policy Autonomy," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 33-66, October.
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    8. Frankel, Jeffrey & Schmukler, Sergio L. & Serven, Luis, 2004. "Global transmission of interest rates: monetary independence and currency regime," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 701-733, September.
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    11. Sebastian Edwards, 2015. "Monetary Policy Independence under Flexible Exchange Rates: An Illusion?," NBER Working Papers 20893, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    13. Marco J. Lombardi & Feng Zhu, 2018. "A Shadow Policy Rate to Calibrate U.S. Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 14(5), pages 305-346, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Ostry, Jonathan D. & Qureshi, Mahvash S., 2017. "A Tie That Binds: Revisiting the Trilemma in Emerging Market Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 12093, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. repec:eee:jimfin:v:85:y:2018:i:c:p:20-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ligonniere, Samuel, 2018. "Trilemma, dilemma and global players," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 20-39.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interest rates; Monetary policy; Central bank independence; Exchange rate regimes; Floating exchange rates; Capital controls; Developed countries; Econometric models;

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