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Gender Diversity in Senior Positions and Firm Performance; Evidence from Europe

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  • Lone Engbo Christiansen
  • Huidan Huidan Lin
  • Joana Pereira
  • Petia Topalova
  • Rima Turk

Abstract

This paper examines the link between gender diversity in senior corporate positions and financial performance of 2 million companies in Europe. We document a positive association between corporate return on assets and the share of women in senior positions and establish two potential channels through which gender diversity may affect firm performance. The positive correlation is more pronounced in, first, sectors where women form a larger share of the labor force (such as the services sector) and, second, where complementarities in skills and critical thinking are in high demand (such as high-tech and knowledge-intensive sectors).

Suggested Citation

  • Lone Engbo Christiansen & Huidan Huidan Lin & Joana Pereira & Petia Topalova & Rima Turk, 2016. "Gender Diversity in Senior Positions and Firm Performance; Evidence from Europe," IMF Working Papers 16/50, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:16/50
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Tyrowicz & Siri Terjesen & Jakub Mazurek, 2017. "All on board? New evidence on board gender diversity from a large panel of firms," GRAPE Working Papers 5, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    2. repec:eee:chieco:v:55:y:2019:i:c:p:19-36 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:eecrev:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:19-38 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporate sector; Europe; Gender; Women; Business enterprises; Corporate governance; Public corporations; Cross country analysis; Gender diversity; senior management; firm performance; gender; women; female intensity; labor force; productivity; General; Economics of Gender; Public Policy; Personnel Economics: General;

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