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Supervisory Incentives in a Banking Union

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  • Elena Carletti
  • Giovanni Dell'Ariccia
  • Robert Marquez

Abstract

We explore the behavior of supervisors when a centralized agency has full power over all decisions regarding banks, but relies on local supervisors to collect the information necessary to act. This institutional design entails a principal-agent problem between the central and local supervisors if their objective functions differ. Information collection may be inferior to that under fully independent local supervisors or under centralized information collection. And this may increase risk-taking by regulated banks. Yet, a “tougher” central supervisor may increase regulatory standards. Thus, the net effect of centralization on bank risk taking depends on the balance of these two effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Carletti & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Robert Marquez, 2016. "Supervisory Incentives in a Banking Union," IMF Working Papers 16/186, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:16/186
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Haritchabalet, Carole & Lepetit, Laetitia & Spinassou, Kévin & Strobel, Frank, 2017. "Bank capital regulation: Are local or central regulators better?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 103-114.
    2. Buch, Claudia M. & Krause, Thomas & Tonzer, Lena, 2019. "Drivers of systemic risk: Do national and European perspectives differ?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 160-176.
    3. Ampudia, Miguel & Beck, Thorsten & Beyer, Andreas & Colliard, Jean-Edouard & Leonello, Agnese & Maddaloni, Angela & Marqués-Ibáñez, David, 2019. "The architecture of supervision," Working Paper Series 2287, European Central Bank.
    4. Näther, Maria & Vollmer, Uwe, 2019. "National versus supranational bank regulation: Gains and losses of joining a banking union," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 1-18.
    5. Altavilla, Carlo & Boucinha, Miguel & Peydró, José-Luis & Smets, Frank, 2019. "Banking Supervision, Monetary Policy and Risk-Taking: Big Data Evidence from 15 Credit Registers’," EconStor Preprints 216793, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    6. Marius Clemens & Stefan Gebauer & Tobias König, 2020. "The Macroeconomic Effects of a European Deposit (Re-) Insurance Scheme," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1873, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Marcella Lucchetta & Michele Moretto & Bruno Maria Parigi, 2018. "Systematic Risk, Bank Moral Hazard, and Bailouts," CESifo Working Paper Series 6878, CESifo.
    8. Anatoli Segura & Sergio Vicente, 2019. "Bank resolution and public backstop in an asymmetric banking union," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1212, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking sector; Euro Area; Bank supervision; European Central Bank; Centralized bank supervision; bank risk taking; limited liability;

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