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Capital Inflows, Credit Growth, and Financial Systems

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  • Deniz O Igan
  • Zhibo Tan

Abstract

Exploiting a granular panel dataset that breaks down capital inflows into FDI, portfolio and other categories, and distinguishes between credit to the household sector and to the corporate sector, we investigate the association between capital inflows and credit growth. We find that non-FDI capital inflows boost credit growth and increase the likelihood of credit booms in both household and corporate sectors. For household credit growth, the composition of capital inflows appears to be more important than financial system characteristics. In contrast, for corporate credit growth, both the composition and the financial system matter. Regardless of sectors and financial systems, net other inflows are always linked to rapid credit growth. Firm-level data corroborate these findings and hint at a causal link: net other inflows are related to more rapid credit growth for firms that rely more heavily on external financing. Further explorations on how capital flows translate into more credit indicate that both demand and supply side factors play a role.

Suggested Citation

  • Deniz O Igan & Zhibo Tan, 2015. "Capital Inflows, Credit Growth, and Financial Systems," IMF Working Papers 15/193, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:15/193
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hoggarth, Glen & Jung, Carsten & Reinhardt, Dennis, 2016. "Capital inflows — the good, the bad and the bubbly," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 40, Bank of England.
    2. Leonardo Gambacorta & Andrés Murcia, 2019. "The impact of macroprudential policies and their interaction with monetary policy: an empirical analysis using credit registry data," IFC Bulletins chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Are post-crisis statistical initiatives completed?, volume 49 Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Eugenio Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Andrew K. Rose, 2019. "How Important is the Global Financial Cycle? Evidence from Capital Flows," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 67(1), pages 24-60, March.
    4. Maciej Albinowski, 2017. "The role of fractional-reserve banking in amplifying credit booms: evidence from panel data," Working Papers 2017-024, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis.
    5. Christiane Kneer & Alexander Raabe, 2019. "Tracking foreign capital: the effect of capital inflows on bank lending in the UK," ECON - Working Papers 326, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    6. repec:eee:ememar:v:31:y:2017:i:c:p:193-208 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:wsi:rpbfmp:v:04:y:2001:i:02:n:s0219091501000413 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Agata Wierzbowska & Masahiko Shibamoto, 2015. "Cross-Country Evidence on Determinants of Fiscal Policy Effectiveness –The Role of Capital Flows and a Country's International Trade and Financial Position," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-08, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    9. Alexander Raabe & Christiane Kneer, 2019. "Tracking Foreign Capital: The Effect of Capital Inflows on Bank Lending in the UK," IHEID Working Papers 10-2019, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    10. Kneer, Christiane & Raabe, Alexander, 2019. "Tracking foreign capital: the effect of capital inflows on bank lending in the UK," Bank of England working papers 804, Bank of England.

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