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Does Openness Matter for Financial Development in Africa?

Author

Listed:
  • Antonio David
  • Montfort Mlachila
  • Ashwin Moheeput

Abstract

This paper analyzes the links between financial and trade openness and financial development in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. It is based on a panel dataset using methods that tackle slope heterogeneity, cross-sectional dependence and non-stationarity, important econometric problems that are often ignored in the literature. The results do not point to a general direct robust link between trade and capital account openness and financial development in SSA, once we control for other factors such as GDP per capita and inflation. But there is some indication that trade openness is more important for financial development in countries with better institutional quality. The findings might be due to a number of factors including distortions in domestic financial markets, relatively weak institutions and/or poor financial sector supervision. Thus, African policy makers should be cautious about expectations regarding immediate gains for financial development from greater international integration. Such gains are more likely to occur through indirect channels.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio David & Montfort Mlachila & Ashwin Moheeput, 2014. "Does Openness Matter for Financial Development in Africa?," IMF Working Papers 14/94, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:14/94
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adrian Alter & Boriana Yontcheva, 2015. "Financial Inclusion and Development in the CEMAC," IMF Working Papers 15/235, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Abayomi Toyin Onanuga Olaronke Toyin Onanuga, 2016. "Do Financial and Trade Openness Lead to Financial Sector Development in Nigeria?," Zagreb International Review of Economics and Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb, vol. 19(2), pages 57-68, November.
    3. repec:blg:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:3:p:5-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Khoutem Ben Jedidia, 2015. "Trade openness-financial development nexus: Bounds testing approach and causality tests for Tunisia," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(58), pages 27-50, December.
    5. Onanuga, Olaronke & Onanuga, Abayomi, 2016. "The Response of Banking Sector Development to Financial and Trade Openness in the presence of Global Financial Crisis in Africa," MPRA Paper 83327, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Sep 2016.
    6. Ahmed, Abdullahi D., 2016. "Integration of financial markets, financial development and growth: Is Africa different?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 43-59.

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