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Global Liquidity and Drivers of Cross-Border Bank Flows

Author

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  • Eugenio M Cerutti
  • Stijn Claessens
  • Lev Ratnovski

Abstract

This paper provides a definition of global liquidity consistent with its meaning as the “ease of financing” in international financial markets. Using a longer time series and broader sample of countries than in previous studies, it identifies global factors driving cross-border bank flows, alongside country-specific factors. It confirms the explanatory power of US financial conditions, with flows decreasing in market volatility (VIX) and term premia, and increasing in bank leverage, growth in domestic credit and M2. A new finding is that similar variables for other systemic countries – the UK and the Euro Area – are also important, sometimes even more so, consistent with the dominant role of European banks in cross-border banking. Furthermore, recipient country characteristics are found to affect not only the level of country-specific flows, but also the cyclical impact of global liquidity, with sensitivities of flows to banks decreasing with stronger macroeconomic frameworks and better bank regulation, but less so for flows to non-financial firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenio M Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Lev Ratnovski, 2014. "Global Liquidity and Drivers of Cross-Border Bank Flows," IMF Working Papers 14/69, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:14/69
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross country analysis; Capital flows; Banks; Bank supervision; Bank regulations; Global liquidity; International financial markets; International banking; Liquidity; F21; F34; G15; G18; G21; G28; banking; bank claims; bank borrowers; International Lending and Debt Problems; Government Policy and Regulation; Government Policy and Regulation; Capital Flows.;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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