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India’s Recent Macroeconomic Performance; An Assessment and Way Forward

  • Muneesh Kapur
  • Rakesh Mohan

The macroeconomic policy response in India after the North Atlantic financial crisis (NAFC) was rapid. The overshooting of the stimulus and its gradual withdrawal sowed seeds for inflationary and BoP pressures and growth slowdown, then exacerbated by domestic policy bottlenecks and volatility in international financial markets during mid-2013. Appropriate domestic oil prices and fiscal consolidation will contribute to the recovery of private sector investment. Fiscal consolidation would also facilitate a reduction in inflation, which would moderate gold imports and favorably impact real exchange rate and current account deficit.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 14/68.

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Length: 66
Date of creation: 29 Apr 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:14/68
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