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From Volatility to Stability in Expenditure; Stabilization Funds in Resource-Rich Countries

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  • Naotaka Sugawara

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of stabilization funds on the volatility of government expenditure in resource-rich countries. Using a panel data set of 68 resource-rich countries over 1988–2012, the results find that the existence of stabilization funds contributes to smoothing government expenditure. The spending volatility in countries that have established such funds is found to be 13 percent lower in the main estimation, and similar impacts are found in robustness tests. The analysis also shows that political institutions and fiscal rules are significant factors in reducing the expenditure volatility, while highlighting the roles of the size of economy, diversified exports, real sector management, and financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Naotaka Sugawara, 2014. "From Volatility to Stability in Expenditure; Stabilization Funds in Resource-Rich Countries," IMF Working Papers 14/43, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:14/43
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    Cited by:

    1. Kamiar Mohaddes & Mehdi Raissi, 2017. "Do Sovereign Wealth Funds Dampen the Negative Effects of Commodity Price Volatility?," Working Papers 1106, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Aug 2000.
    2. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:3:p:567-590 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Pitterle, Ingo & Haufler, Fabio & Hong, Pingfan, 2015. "Assessing emerging markets’ vulnerability to financial crisis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 484-500.
    4. Yves Jégourel, 2015. "Sovereign Stabilization Funds and the End of the Commodities Super-cycle: What are the Challenges?," Policy notes & Policy briefs 1523, OCP Policy Center.
    5. Tsani, Stella, 2015. "On the relationship between resource funds, governance and institutions: Evidence from quantile regression analysis," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 94-111.

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