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A Framework for Macroprudential Bank Solvency Stress Testing; Application to S-25 and Other G-20 Country FSAPs

  • Andreas A. Jobst
  • Li L. Ong
  • Christian Schmieder

The global financial crisis has placed the spotlight squarely on bank stress tests. Stress tests conducted in the lead-up to the crisis, including those by IMF staff, were not always able to identify the right risks and vulnerabilities. Since then, IMF staff has developed more robust stress testing methods and models and adopted a more coherent and consistent approach. This paper articulates the solvency stress testing framework that is being applied in the IMF’s surveillance of member countries’ banking systems, and discusses examples of its actual implementation in FSAPs to 18 countries which are in the group comprising the 25 most systemically important financial systems (“S-25â€) plus other G-20 countries. In doing so, the paper also offers useful guidance for readers seeking to develop their own stress testing frameworks and country authorities preparing for FSAPs. A detailed Stress Test Matrix (STeM) comparing the stress test parameters applie in each of these major country FSAPs is provided, together with our stress test output templates.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 13/68.

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Length: 55
Date of creation: 13 Mar 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/68
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  1. Marco A. Espinosa-Vega & Juan Solé, 2011. "Cross-border financial surveillance: a network perspective," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 182-205, August.
  2. Claudio Borio & Mathias Drehmann & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2012. "Stress-testing macro stress testing: does it live up to expectations?," BIS Working Papers 369, Bank for International Settlements.
  3. Bayoumi, Tamim & Vitek, Francis, 2011. "Spillovers from the Euro Area Sovereign Debt Crisis: A Macroeconometric Model Based Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 8497, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Andreas A. Jobst & Dale F. Gray, 2013. "Systemic Contingent Claims Analysis; Estimating Market-Implied Systemic Risk," IMF Working Papers 13/54, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Rodrigo Alfaro & Mathias Drehmann, 2009. "Macro stress tests and crises: what can we learn?," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
  6. Eugenio Cerutti & Christian Schmieder, 2012. "The Need for "Un-consolidating" Consolidated Banks' Stress Tests," IMF Working Papers 12/288, International Monetary Fund.
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