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Rules, Discretion, and Macro-Prudential Policy

  • Itai Agur
  • Sunil Sharma

The paper examines the implementation of macro-prudential policy. Given the coordination, flow of information, analysis, and communication required, macro-prudential frameworks will have weaknesses that make it hard to implement policy. And dealing with the political economy is also likely to be challenging. But limiting discretion through the formulation of macro-prudential rules is complicated by the difficulties in detecting and measuring systemic risk. The paper suggests that oversight is best served by having a strong baseline regulatory regime on which a time-varying macro-prudential policy can be added as conditions warrant and permit.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 13/65.

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Length: 32
Date of creation: 08 Mar 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/65
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Ignazio Angeloni, 2009. "A Tale of Two Policies: Prudential Regulation and Monetary Policy with Fragile Banks," Working Papers 345, Bruegel.
  2. Reza Siregar, 2011. "Macro-Prudential Approaches to Banking Regulation : Perspectives of Selected Asian Central Banks," Finance Working Papers 23211, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  3. Aikman, David & Alessandri, Piergiorgio & Eklund, Bruno & Gai, Prasanna & Kapadia, Sujit & Martin, Elizabeth & Mora, Nada & Sterne, Gabriel & Willison, Matthew, 2009. "Funding liquidity risk in a quantitative model of systemic stability," Bank of England working papers 372, Bank of England.
  4. Hart, Oliver & Zingales, Luigi, 2009. "A New Capital Regulation For Large Financial Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 7298, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Inci Ötker & Aditya Narain & Anna Ilyina & Jay Surti, 2011. "The Too-Important-to-Fail Conundrum; Impossible to Ignore and Difficult to Resolve," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 11/12, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Claudio Borio & Ilhyock Shim, 2007. "What can (macro-)prudential policy do to support monetary policy?," BIS Working Papers 242, Bank for International Settlements.
  7. Stijn Claessens & Lev Ratnovski & Manmohan Singh, 2012. "Shadow Banking; Economics and Policy," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 12/12, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Nier, Erlend & Yang, Jing & Yorulmazer, Tanju & Alentorn, Amadeo, 2008. "Network models and financial stability," Bank of England working papers 346, Bank of England.
  9. Gianni De Nicolo & Giovanni Favara & Lev Ratnovski, 2012. "Externalities and Macroprudential Policy," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 12/05, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Lasse Heje Pederson & Markus K Brunnermeier, 2007. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," FMG Discussion Papers dp580, Financial Markets Group.
  11. Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig, 2013. "The Bankers' New Clothes: What's Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 9929.
  12. Andrei Shleifer & Robert Vishny, 2011. "Fire Sales in Finance and Macroeconomics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 29-48, Winter.
  13. Alan D. Morrison, 2011. "Systemic risks and the 'too-big-to-fail' problem'," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 498-516.
  14. Richard J. Rosen, 2002. "Is three a crowd? competition among regulators in banking," Proceedings 906, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  15. Michal Kowalik, 2011. "Countercyclical capital regulation: should bank regulators use rules or discretion?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II.
  16. Charles Goodhart, 2011. "The Macro-Prudential Authority: Powers, Scope and Accountability," FMG Special Papers sp203, Financial Markets Group.
  17. Erlend Nier & Luis Ignacio Jácome & Jacek Osinski & Pamela Madrid, 2011. "Towards Effective Macroprudential Policy Frameworks; An Assessment of Stylized Institutional Models," IMF Working Papers 11/250, International Monetary Fund.
  18. Masciandaro, Donato & Quintyn, Marc & Taylor, Michael W., 2008. "Inside and outside the central bank: Independence and accountability in financial supervision: Trends and determinants," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 833-848, December.
  19. Morris, Charles & Hoenig, Thomas, 2011. "Restructuring the Banking System to Improve Safety and Soundness," MPRA Paper 47614, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2012.
  20. Goodhart, Charles & Schoenmaker, Dirk, 1995. "Should the Functions of Monetary Policy and Banking Supervision Be Separated?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(4), pages 539-60, October.
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