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Drivers of Growth; Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries

  • Manuk Ghazanchyan
  • Janet Gale Stotsky

This study examines the drivers of growth in Sub-Saharan African countries, using aggregate data, from the past decade. We correlate recent growth experience to key determinants of growth, including private and public investment, government consumption, the exchange regime and real exchange rate, and current account liberalization, using various econometric methodologies, including fixed and random effects models, with cluster-robust standard errors. We find that, depending on the specification, higher private and public investments boost growth. Some evidence is found that government consumption exerts a drag on growth and that more flexible exchange regimes are beneficial to growth. The real exchange rate and liberalization variables are not significant.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 13/236.

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Length: 38
Date of creation: 22 Nov 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/236
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  1. Barry Eichengreen & Raul Razo‚ÄźGarcia, 2013. "How Reliable Are De Facto Exchange Rate Regime Classifications?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 216-239, 07.
  2. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  3. Morten Jerven, 2013. "Comparability of GDP estimates in Sub-Saharan Africa: The effect of Revisions in Sources and Methods Since Structural Adjustment," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59, pages S16-S36, October.
  4. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2004. "The modern history of exchange rate arrangements: A reinterpretation," MPRA Paper 14070, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. William Miles, 2006. "To Float Or Not To Float? Currency Regimes And Growth," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 91-105, December.
  6. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
  7. Rose, Andrew K, 2010. "Exchange Rate Regimes in the Modern Era: Fixed, Floating, and Flaky," CEPR Discussion Papers 7987, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
  9. Michael W. Klein & Jay C. Shambaugh, 2010. "Exchange Rate Regimes in the Modern Era," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262013657, December.
  10. Dani Rodrik, 2008. "The Real Exchange Rate and Economic Growth," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 39(2 (Fall)), pages 365-439.
  11. Vishal Jaunky, 2013. "Democracy and economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: a panel data approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 987-1008, October.
  12. Atish R. Ghosh & Anne-Marie Gulde & Jonathan D. Ostry & Holger C. Wolf, 1997. "Does The Nominal Exchange Rate Regime Matter?," Working Papers 97-09, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  13. Petreski, Marjan, 2009. "Exchange-rate regime and economic growth: a review of the theoretical and empirical literature," Economics Discussion Papers 2009-31, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  14. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1998. "Explaining African economic performance," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1997-02.2, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  15. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-26, November.
  16. Philipp Harms & Marco Kretschmann, 2009. "Words, Deeds And Outcomes: A Survey On The Growth Effects Of Exchange Rate Regimes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 139-164, 02.
  17. Andrew Berg & Yanliang Miao, 2010. "The Real Exchange Rate and Growth Revisited; The Washington Consensus Strikes Back?," IMF Working Papers 10/58, International Monetary Fund.
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