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The Growth Comeback in Developing Economies; A New Hope or Back to the Future?


  • John C Bluedorn
  • Rupa Duttagupta
  • Jaime Guajardo
  • Nkunde Mwase


Growth takeoffs in developing economies have rebounded in the past two decades. Although recent takeoffs have lasted longer than takeoffs before the 1990s, a key question is whether they could unravel like some did in the past. This paper finds that recent takeoffs are associated with stronger economic conditions, such as lower post-takeoff debt and inflation levels; more competitive real exchange rates; and better structural reforms and institutions. The chances of starting a takeoff in the 2000s was triple that before the 1990s, with domestic conditions accounting for most of the increase. The findings suggest that if today’s dynamic developing economies sustain their improved policies; they are more likely to stay on course compared to many of their predecessors.

Suggested Citation

  • John C Bluedorn & Rupa Duttagupta & Jaime Guajardo & Nkunde Mwase, 2013. "The Growth Comeback in Developing Economies; A New Hope or Back to the Future?," IMF Working Papers 13/132, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/132

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Abiad, Abdul & Bluedorn, John & Guajardo, Jaime & Topalova, Petia, 2015. "The Rising Resilience of Emerging Market and Developing Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1-26.
    2. Domínguez, Rafael & Olivié, Iliana, 2014. "Retos para la cooperación al desarrollo en el post-2015 /Challenges for Development Cooperation in the Post-2015," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 32, pages 995-1020, Septiembr.


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