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Inclusive Growth and the Incidence of Fiscal Policy in Mauritius; Much Progress, But More Could be Done

  • Antonio David
  • Martin Petri

Using data from three household surveys, we review whether growth in Mauritius was inclusive and discuss the incidence of public expenditures and taxes. Generally, Mauritius enjoys an even income distribution and low rates of poverty. Nevertheless, over the 2000s, despite overall progress, the benefits of growth appear to have become more skewed. Employment income is the main contributor to inequality in Mauritius. Social protection expenditures reduce poverty and inequality, but could be better targeted, particularly for pensions. Income taxes are progressive, though given their small relative weight they have a negligible impact on income distribution. The VAT appears relatively progressive compared to other developing countries, although its impact on the overall distribution is also small. With better targeting of the sizable social spending, significant further progress in poverty alleviation could be achieved.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 13/116.

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Length: 28
Date of creation: 17 May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/116
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  1. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2010. "Mauritius: African Success Story," NBER Working Papers 16569, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Chu, K.-y. & Davoodi, H. & Gupta, S., 2000. "Income Distribution and Tax, and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries," Research Paper 214, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
  3. Rodrigo Cubero & Ivanna Vladkova Hollar, 2010. "Equity and Fiscal Policy; The Income Distribution Effects of Taxation and Social Spending in Central America," IMF Working Papers 10/112, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Joao Pedro Azevedo & Minh Cong Nguyen & Viviane Sanfelice, 2012. "ADECOMP: Stata module to estimate Shapley Decomposition by Components of a Welfare Measure," Statistical Software Components S457562, Boston College Department of Economics.
  5. Haroon Bhorat & David Tseng & Benjamin Stanwix, 2014. "Pro-poor growth and social protection in South Africa: Exploring the interactions," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 219-240, March.
  6. Subramanian, Arvind, 2009. "The Mauritian Success Story and its Lessons," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. David E. Sahn & Stephen D. Younger, 2000. "Expenditure incidence in Africa: microeconomic evidence," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(3), pages 329-347, September.
  8. Azevedo, Joao Pedro & Inchauste, Gabriela & Olivieri, Sergio & Saavedra, Jaime & Winkler, Hernan, 2013. "Is labor income responsible for poverty reduction ? a decomposition approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6414, The World Bank.
  9. Richard Bird & Pierre-Pascal Gendron, 2006. "Is VAT the Best Way to Impose a General Consumption Tax in Developing Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0618, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  10. Richard M. Bird, 2006. "Is VAT the Best Way to Impose a General Consumption Tax in Developing Countries?," International Tax Program Papers 0602, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
  11. Chris Papageorgiou & Subir Lall & Florence Jaumotte, 2008. "Rising Income Inequality; Technology, o+L3904r Trade and Financial Globalization?," IMF Working Papers 08/185, International Monetary Fund.
  12. Marito Garcia & Charity M. T. Moore, 2012. "The Cash Dividend : The Rise of Cash Transfer Programs in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2246, September.
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