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Near-Coincident Indicators of Systemic Stress

Author

Listed:
  • Ivailo Arsov
  • Elie Canetti
  • Laura E. Kodres
  • Srobona Mitra

Abstract

The G-20 Data Gaps Initiative has called for the IMF to develop standard measures of tail risk, which we identify in this paper with systemic risk. To understand the conditions under which tail risk is present, it is first necessary to develop a measure of what constitutes a systemic stress, or tail, event. We develop such a measure and uses it to assess the performance of eleven near-term systemic risk indicators as ‘early’ warning of distress among top financial institutions in the United States and the euro area. Two indicators perform particularly well in both regions, and a couple of other simple indicators do well across a number of criteria. We also find that the sizes of institutions do not necessarily correspond with their contribution to spillover risk. Some practical guidance for policies is provided.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivailo Arsov & Elie Canetti & Laura E. Kodres & Srobona Mitra, 2013. "Near-Coincident Indicators of Systemic Stress," IMF Working Papers 13/115, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:13/115
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. FrancisX. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2009. "Measuring Financial Asset Return and Volatility Spillovers, with Application to Global Equity Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 158-171, January.
    2. Schwaab, Bernd & Koopman, Siem Jan & Lucas, André, 2011. "Systemic risk diagnostics: coincident indicators and early warning signals," Working Paper Series 1327, European Central Bank.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2009. "How to Stop a Herd of Running Bears? Market Response to Policy Initiatives during the Global Financial Crisis," IMF Working Papers 09/204, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Arturo Estrella, 2005. "Why Does the Yield Curve Predict Output and Inflation?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(505), pages 722-744, July.
    6. Rodríguez-Moreno, María & Peña, Juan Ignacio, 2013. "Systemic risk measures: The simpler the better?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1817-1831.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Judith Eidenberger & Benjamin Neudorfer & Michael Sigmund & Ingrid Stein, 2013. "Quantifying Financial Stability in Austria, New Tools for Macroprudential Supervision," Financial Stability Report, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 26, pages 62-81.
    2. Dimitris Korobilis & Kamil Yilmaz, 2018. "Measuring Dynamic Connectedness with Large Bayesian VAR Models," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1802, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    3. Hallissey, Niamh, 2016. "Interconnectedness of the Irish banking sector with the global financial system," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 66-82, January.
    4. Giglio, Stefano & Kelly, Bryan & Pruitt, Seth, 2016. "Systemic risk and the macroeconomy: An empirical evaluation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 457-471.
    5. Carsten Detken & Olaf Weeken & Lucia Alessi & Diana Bonfim & Miguel M. Boucinha & Christian Castro & Sebastian Frontczak & Gaston Giordana & Julia Giese & Nadya Jahn & Jan Kakes & Benjamin Klaus & Jan, 2014. "Operationalising the countercyclical capital buffer: indicator selection, threshold identification and calibration options," ESRB Occasional Paper Series 05, European Systemic Risk Board.

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