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Does Central Bank Capital Matter for Monetary Policy?

  • Camilo E Tovar Mora
  • Pedro Castro
  • Gustavo Adler

Heavy foreign exchange intervention by central banks of emerging markets have lead to sizeable expansions of their balance sheets in recent years?accumulating foreign assets and non-money domestic liabilities (the latter due to sterilization operations). With domestic liabilities being mostly of short-term maturity and denominated in local currency, movements in domestic monetary policy interest rates can have sizable effects on central bank's net worth. In this paper we examine empirically whether balance sheet considerations influence the conduct of monetary policy. Our methodology involves the estimation of interest rate rules for a sample of 41 countries and testing whether deviations from the rule can be explained by a measure of central bank financial strength. Our findings, using linear and nonlinear techniques, suggests that central bank financial strength can be a statistically significant factor explaining large negative interest rate deviations from "optimal" levels.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 12/60.

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Length: 22
Date of creation: 01 Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/60
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  1. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1998. "Monetary Policy Rules and Macroeconomic Stability: Evidence and Some Theory," NBER Working Papers 6442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jaromir Benes & Andrew Berg & Rafael Portillo & David Vavra, 2015. "Modeling Sterilized Interventions and Balance Sheet Effects of Monetary Policy in a New-Keynesian Framework," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 81-108, February.
  3. Gustavo Adler & Camilo E Tovar Mora, 2011. "Foreign Exchange Intervention; A Shield Against Appreciation Winds?," IMF Working Papers 11/165, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Del Negro, Marco & Sims, Christopher A., 2015. "When does a central bank׳s balance sheet require fiscal support?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 1-19.
  5. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, September.
  6. Perera, Anil & Ralston, Deborah & Wickramanayake, Jayasinghe, 2013. "Central bank financial strength and inflation: Is there a robust link?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 399-414.
  7. Todd E. Clark & Kenneth D. West, 2004. "Using out-of-sample mean squared prediction errors to test the Martingale difference hypothesis," Research Working Paper RWP 04-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  8. Olivier D Jeanne & Lars E. O. Svensson, 2004. "Credible Commitment to Optimal Escape from a Liquidity Trap; The Role of the Balance Sheet of an Independent Central Bank," IMF Working Papers 04/162, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Carvalho, Alexandre & Moura, Marcelo L., 2008. "What Can Taylor Rules Say About Monetary Policy in Latin America?," Insper Working Papers wpe_126, Insper Working Paper, Insper Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa.
  10. Stephen Williamson, 2014. "The Balance Sheet and the Future of Fed Policy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 163-170, February.
  11. Todd E. Clark & Kenneth D. West, 2005. "Approximately normal tests for equal predictive accuracy in nested models," Research Working Paper RWP 05-05, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  12. Victoria Miller & Luc Vallée, 2011. "Central Bank Balance Sheets and the Transmission of Financial Crises," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 355-363, April.
  13. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1997. "Monetary Policy Rules in Practice: Some International Evidence," NBER Working Papers 6254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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