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Effects of Capital Flow Liberalization; What is the Evidence from Recent Experiences of Emerging Market Economies?


  • Tahsin Saadi Sedik
  • Tao Sun


This paper analyzes the experiences of emerging market economies (EMEs) that have liberalized capital flows over the past 15 years with respect to macroeconomic performance and risks to financial stability. The results of the panel data regressions indicate that greater openness to capital flows is associated with higher growth, gross capital flows, and equity returns and with lower inflation and bank capital adequacy ratios. The effects vary depending on thresholds. As a potential application of these findings, the paper explores the possible effects of liberalization on China by applying the coefficients of explanatory variables to the corresponding variables of China in 2012–16.

Suggested Citation

  • Tahsin Saadi Sedik & Tao Sun, 2012. "Effects of Capital Flow Liberalization; What is the Evidence from Recent Experiences of Emerging Market Economies?," IMF Working Papers 12/275, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/275

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    2. Peter Blair Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(4), pages 887-935, December.
    3. Peter Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Discussion Papers 07-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    5. Eichengreen, Barry & Gullapalli, Rachita & Panizza, Ugo, 2011. "Capital account liberalization, financial development and industry growth: A synthetic view," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1090-1106, October.
    6. Lane, Philip R. & Milesi-Ferretti, Gian Maria, 2007. "The external wealth of nations mark II: Revised and extended estimates of foreign assets and liabilities, 1970-2004," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 223-250, November.
    7. Martin Schindler, 2009. "Measuring Financial Integration: A New Data Set," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(1), pages 222-238, April.
    8. Baltagi, Badi H. & Demetriades, Panicos O. & Law, Siong Hook, 2009. "Financial development and openness: Evidence from panel data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 285-296, July.
    9. James Laurenceson & Kam Ki Tang, 2007. "Opening China's Capital Account: Modeling the Capital Flow Response," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 1-18.
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    Cited by:

    1. George Verikios, 2015. "The implications for trade and FDI flows from liberalisation of China's capital account," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-251, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    2. Mirdala, Rajmund & Svrčeková, Aneta, 2014. "Financial Integration, Volatility of Financial Flows and Macroeconomic Volatility," MPRA Paper 61845, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Mark Kruger & Gurnain Pasricha, 2016. "What to Expect When China Liberalizes Its Capital Account," Discussion Papers 16-10, Bank of Canada.


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