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Fiscal Rules at a Glance; Country Details from a New Dataset

Author

Listed:
  • Nina T Budina
  • Tidiane Kinda
  • Andrea Schaechter
  • Anke Weber

Abstract

This paper provides country-specific information on fiscal rules in use in 81 countries from 1985 to end-September 2012. It serves as background material and update of the July 2012 Working Paper “Fiscal Rules in Response to the Crisis—Toward the ‘Next Generation’ Rules: A New Dataset” and is also available in an easy accessible electronic data visualization tool (http://www.imf.org/external/datamapper/FiscalRules/map/map.htm.).The dataset covers four types of rules: budget balance rules, debt rules, expenditure rules, and revenue rules, applying to the central or general government or the public sector. It also presents details on various characteristics of rules, such as their legal basis, coverage, escape clauses, as well as key supporting features such as independent monitoring bodies.

Suggested Citation

  • Nina T Budina & Tidiane Kinda & Andrea Schaechter & Anke Weber, 2012. "Fiscal Rules at a Glance; Country Details from a New Dataset," IMF Working Papers 12/273, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/273
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerdie Everaert, 2017. "On the estimation of panel fiscal reaction functions : Heterogeneity or fiscal fatigue?," Working Paper Research 320, National Bank of Belgium.
    2. Sacchi, Agnese & Salotti, Simone, 2015. "The impact of national fiscal rules on the stabilisation function of fiscal policy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-20.
    3. Kantorowicz, Jarosław & Köppl-Turyna, Monika, 2017. "Disentangling fiscal effects of local constitutions," Working Papers 06, Agenda Austria.
    4. Rodrigo Caputo & Gustavo Leyva & Michael Pedersen, 2014. "The Changing Nature of Real Exchange Rate Fluctuations. New Evidence for Inflation-Targeting Countries," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 730, Central Bank of Chile.
    5. Bart W. Edes & Peter J. Morgan, 2014. "Managing Fiscal Sustainability and Aging in Emerging Asia," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 10(2), pages 319-348, August.
    6. Juan Carlos Hatchondo & Leonardo Martinez & Francisco Roch, 2012. "Fiscal rules and the sovereign default premium," Working Paper 12-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    7. Andres Fernandez & Andres Gonzalez & Diego Rodriguez, 2015. "Sharing a Ride on the Commodities Roller Coaster; Common Factors in Business Cycles of Emerging Economies," IMF Working Papers 15/280, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Neyapti, Bilin, 2013. "Fiscal decentralization, fiscal rules and fiscal discipline," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 528-532.
    9. David Bartolini & Agnese Sacchi & Simone Salotti & Raffaella Santolini, 2015. "Fiscal decentralisation in times of financial crises," Working Papers. Collection A: Public economics, governance and decentralization 1506, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    10. Carlos Caceres & Serhan Cevik & Ricardo Fenochietto & Borja Gracia, 2015. "The Day After Tomorrow: Designing an Optimal Fiscal Strategy for Libya," Journal of Banking and Financial Economics, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 2(4), pages 32-50, July.
    11. Stanley L. Winer, 2016. "The Political Economy of Taxation: Power, Structure, Redistribution," Carleton Economic Papers 16-15, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    12. Musaev, Rasul & Malakhov, Anton, 2014. ""Budget Law" in Russia: experience and prospects," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, pages 161-170, December.
    13. Haffert, Lukas, 2016. "Permanent budget surpluses as a fiscal regime," MPIfG Discussion Paper 16/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    14. Masahiro Kawai & Peter J. Morgan, 2013. "Long-term Issues for Fiscal Sustainability in Emerging Asia," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 9(4), pages 751-770, September.
    15. Juan Carlos Hatchondo & Leonardo Martinez & César Sosa-Padilla, 2016. "Debt Dilution and Sovereign Default Risk," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(5), pages 1383-1422.
    16. Köppl-Turyna, Monika & Kantorowicz, Jarosław, 2017. "Disentangling fiscal effects of local constitutions," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168163, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Lennart Erixon, 2015. "Can fiscal austerity be expansionary in present-day Europe? The lessons from Sweden," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 3(4), pages 567—601-5, October.

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