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The Evolution of Asian Financial Linkages; Key Determinants and the Role of Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Selim Elekdag
  • Phurichai Rungcharoenkitkul
  • Yiqun Wu

Abstract

This paper examines how Asian financial linkages with systemic economies have changed over time. After developing a factor model, it estimates Asian financial sensitivities to systemic economies, and then seeks to uncover their key determinants, which include trade and financial linkages, as well as policies. In line with Asia’s growing role in the global economy—including through deeper financial integration—regional financial markets have become more sensitive to systemic economies. Asian financial sensitivities to systemic economies exhibit cyclical fluctuations, and reached historically high levels during the latest global financial crisis of 2008–09. While macroeconomic policy frameworks have helped Asian economies cope well with market turbulence, they cannot completely insulate Asian financial markets against major global financial shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Selim Elekdag & Phurichai Rungcharoenkitkul & Yiqun Wu, 2012. "The Evolution of Asian Financial Linkages; Key Determinants and the Role of Policy," IMF Working Papers 12/262, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/262
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bekaert, Geert & Ehrmann, Michael & Fratzscher, Marcel & Mehl, Arnaud, 2011. "Global crises and equity market contagion," CEPR Discussion Papers 8438, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48.
    3. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    4. Phurichai Rungcharoenkitkul, 2011. "Risk Sharing and Financial Contagion in Asia; An Asset Price Perspective," IMF Working Papers 11/242, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Stephan Danninger & Irina Tytell & Ravi Balakrishnan & Selim Elekdag, 2009. "The Transmission of Financial Stress from Advanced to Emerging Economies," IMF Working Papers 09/133, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cavoli, Tony & Rajan, Ramkishen S., 2015. "Capital inflows and the interest premium problem: The effects of monetary sterilisation in selected Asian economies," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-18.
    2. Serkan Arslanalp & Wei Liao & Shi Piao & Dulani Seneviratne, 2016. "China’s Growing Influence on Asian Financial Markets," IMF Working Papers 16/173, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Lillie Lam & James Yetman, 2013. "Asia's Decoupling: Fact, Fairytale or Forecast?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 321-344, August.
    4. Lillie Lam & James Yetman, 2013. "Asia’s decoupling: fact, forecast or fiction?," BIS Working Papers 438, Bank for International Settlements.

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