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Tax Composition and Growth; A Broad Cross-Country Perspective

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  • Santiago Acosta Ormaechea
  • Jiae Yoo

Abstract

We investigate the relation between changes in tax composition and long-run economic growth using a new dataset covering a broad cross-section of countries with different income levels. We specifically consider 69 countries with at least 20 years of observations on total tax revenue during the period 1970-2009—21 high-income, 23 middle-income and 25 low-income countries. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive and up-to-date dataset on tax composition and growth. We find that increasing income taxes while reducing consumption and property taxes is associated with slower growth over the long run. We also find that: (1) among income taxes, social security contributions and personal income taxes have a stronger negative association with growth than corporate income taxes; (2) a shift from income taxes to property taxes has a strong positive association with growth; and (3) a reduction in income taxes while increasing value added and sales taxes is also associated with faster growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Santiago Acosta Ormaechea & Jiae Yoo, 2012. "Tax Composition and Growth; A Broad Cross-Country Perspective," IMF Working Papers 12/257, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Baunsgaard, Thomas & Keen, Michael, 2010. "Tax revenue and (or?) trade liberalization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 563-577, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Atsuyoshi Morozumi & Francisco José Veiga & Linda Gonçalves Veiga, "undated". "Electoral effects on the composition of public spending and revenue: evidence from a large panel of countries," Discussion Papers 2014/16, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    2. Godin, M. & Hindriks, J., 2015. "A Review of Critical Issues on Tax Design and Tax Administration in a Global Economy and Developing Countries," CORE Discussion Papers 2015028, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    3. Stefan Bach & Margit Schratzenstaller, 2013. "Höhere "Reichensteuern": Möglichkeiten und Grenzen: Editorial," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 82(1), pages 5-12.
    4. Åsa Johansson, 2016. "Public Finance, Economic Growth and Inequality: A Survey of the Evidence," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1346, OECD Publishing.
    5. Oguzhan Akgun & Boris Cournède & Jean-Marc Fournier, 2017. "The effects of the tax mix on inequality and growth," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1447, OECD Publishing.
    6. Misch, Florian & Gemmell, Norman & Kneller, Richard, 2014. "Complementarity in Models of Public Finance and Endogenous Growth," Working Paper Series 3136, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    7. Angela Köppl & Margit Schratzenstaller, 2015. "The Austrian Tax System – Reform Perspectives," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 88(2), pages 127-135, February.
    8. repec:nam:befdwp:7 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Presbitero, Andrea F. & Sacchi, Agnese & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2014. "Property tax and fiscal discipline in OECD countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(3), pages 428-433.

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