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Exchange Rate and Foreign Interest Rate Linkages for Sub-Saharan Africa Floaters


  • Alun H. Thomas


The paper considers the determinants of exchange rate movements among sub-Saharan countries that have flexible exchange rate regimes. The determinants are based on the law of one price and interest parity conditions. Results indicate that the exchange rates have responded significantly to changes in the US Treasury bill rate and to the EMBI spread in recent years. The effects are more important for countries with open capital accounts. On the other hand the paper does not provide any support for the interest rate parity theory because domestic interest rates have no bearing on exchange rate movements.

Suggested Citation

  • Alun H. Thomas, 2012. "Exchange Rate and Foreign Interest Rate Linkages for Sub-Saharan Africa Floaters," IMF Working Papers 12/208, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/208

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    2. Moses M. Sichei & Tewodros G. Gebreselasie & Olusegun A. Akanbi, 2005. "An Econometric Model of the Rand-US Dollar Nominal Exchange Rate," Working Papers 200514, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Clark, Todd E. & West, Kenneth D., 2007. "Approximately normal tests for equal predictive accuracy in nested models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 291-311, May.
    4. Miguel Lacerda & Johannes W. Fedderke & Linda M. Haines, 2010. "Testing For Purchasing Power Parity And Uncovered Interest Parity In The Presence Of Monetary And Exchange Rate Regime Shifts," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(4), pages 363-382, December.
    5. Ratna Sahay & Luis Felipe CĂ©spedes & Paul Cashin, 2002. "Keynes, Cocoa, and Copper; In Search of Commodity Currencies," IMF Working Papers 02/223, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Sami Alpanda & Kevin Kotzé & Geoffrey Woglom, 2010. "The Role Of The Exchange Rate In A New Keynesian Dsge Model For The South African Economy," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(2), pages 170-191, June.
    7. Menzie D. Chinn & Guy Meredith, 2005. "Testing Uncovered Interest Parity at Short and Long Horizons during the Post-Bretton Woods Era," NBER Working Papers 11077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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