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Measuring Systemic Liquidity Risk and the Cost of Liquidity Insurance

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  • Tiago Severo

Abstract

I construct a systemic liquidity risk index (SLRI) from data on violations of arbitrage relationships across several asset classes between 2004 and 2010. Then I test whether the equity returns of 53 global banks were exposed to this liquidity risk factor. Results show that the level of bank returns is not directly affected by the SLRI, but their volatility increases when liquidity conditions deteriorate. I do not find a strong association between bank size and exposure to the SLRI - measured as the sensitivity of volatility to the index. Surprisingly, exposure to systemic liquidity risk is positively associated with the Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR). The link between equity volatility and the SLRI allows me to calculate the cost that would be borne by public authorities for providing liquidity support to the financial sector. I use this information to estimate a liquidity insurance premium that could be paid by individual banks in order to cover for that social cost.

Suggested Citation

  • Tiago Severo, 2012. "Measuring Systemic Liquidity Risk and the Cost of Liquidity Insurance," IMF Working Papers 12/194, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Niall Coffey & Warren B. Hrung & Asani Sarkar, 2009. "Capital constraints, counterparty risk, and deviations from covered interest rate parity," Staff Reports 393, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Stefano Giglio, 2011. "Credit default swap spreads and systemic financial risk," Proceedings 1122, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    3. Emmanuel Farhi & Jean Tirole, 2012. "Collective Moral Hazard, Maturity Mismatch, and Systemic Bailouts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 60-93, February.
    4. Tommaso Mancini Griffoli & Angelo Ranaldo, 2010. "Limits to arbitrage during the crisis: funding liquidity constraints and covered interest parity," Working Papers 2010-14, Swiss National Bank.
    5. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Martin Oehmke, 2013. "The Maturity Rat Race," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(2), pages 483-521, April.
    6. Dale F. Gray & Robert C. Merton & Zvi Bodie, 2006. "A New Framework for Analyzing and Managing Macrofinancial Risks of an Economy," NBER Working Papers 12637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saldías, Martín, 2013. "Systemic risk analysis using forward-looking Distance-to-Default series," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 498-517.
    2. Azusa Takeyama & Naoshi Tsuchida, 2015. "The Interaction between Funding Liquidity and Market Liquidity: Evidence from Subprime and European Crises," IMES Discussion Paper Series 15-E-14, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    3. repec:eee:quaeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:302-313 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Legroux, Vincent & Rahmouni-Rousseau, Imène & Szczerbowicz, Urszula & Valla, Natacha, 2017. "Stabilising virtues of central banks: (re)matching bank liquidity," EIB Working Papers 2017/01, European Investment Bank (EIB).
    5. Jean-Loup SOULA, 2015. "Measuring heterogeneity in bank liquidity risk: who are the winners and the losers?," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2015-09, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks; Credit risk; Liquidity; Insurance; International banks; Systemic risk; stock returns; banking; bank assets; insurance premium; bond; Econometric Modeling; General Financial Markets;

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