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Monetization in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

  • Noriaki Kinoshita
  • Cameron McLoughlin

The degree of an economy’s monetization, which has an important implication on economic growth, can be affected by the conduct of monetary policy, financial sector reform, and episodes of financial crises. The paper finds that monetization--measured by the ratio of broad money to nominal GDP-- in low- to middle-income countries is significantly correlated with per-capita GDP, real interest rates, and financial sector reform. It suggests that maintaining an upward momentum in monetization can be an important policy objective, particularly for low-income countries, and that monetary and financial sector policies need to be conducive to enhancing monetization.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 12/160.

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Length: 23
Date of creation: 01 Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/160
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  1. Rioja, Felix & Valev, Neven, 2004. "Does one size fit all?: a reexamination of the finance and growth relationship," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 429-447, August.
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  7. van Wijnbergen, S., 1982. "Stagflationary effects of monetary stabilization policies : A quantitative analysis of South Korea," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 133-169, April.
  8. Zhuang, Juzhong & Gunatilake, Herath & Niimi, Yoko & Ehsan Khan, Muhammad & Jiang, Yi & Hasan, Rana & Khor, Niny & S. Lagman-Martin, Anneli & Bracey, Pamela & Huang, Biao, 2009. "Financial Sector Development, Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction: A Literature Review," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 173, Asian Development Bank.
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