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How Effective is Monetary Transmission in Low-Income Countries? A Survey of the Empirical Evidence

  • Prachi Mishra
  • Peter Montiel

This paper surveys the evidence on the effectiveness of monetary transmission in low-income countries. It is hard to come away from this review with much confidence in the strength of monetary transmission in such countries. We distinguish between the "facts on the ground" and "methodological deficiencies" interpretations of the absence of evidence for strong monetary transmission. We suspect that "facts on the ground" are an important part of the story. If this conjecture is correct, the stabilization challenge in developing countries is acute indeed, and identifying the means of enhancing the effectiveness of monetary policy in such countries is an important challenge.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 12/143.

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Length: 48
Date of creation: 01 Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:12/143
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  1. Adam Elbourne & Jakob de Haan, 2009. "Modeling Monetary Policy Transmission in Acceding Countries: Vector Autoregression Versus Structural Vector Autoregression," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 45(2), pages 4-20, March.
  2. Georgy Ganev & Krisztina Molnar & Krzysztof Rybinski & Przemyslaw Wozniak, 2002. "Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy in Centraland Eastern Europe," CASE Network Reports 0052, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  3. Harold Ngalawa & Nicola Viegi, 2011. "Dynamic Effects Of Monetary Policy Shocks In Malawi," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 79(3), pages 224-250, 09.
  4. Carlyn Ramlogan, 2004. "The transmission mechanism of monetary policy: Evidence from the Caribbean," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(5), pages 435-447, October.
  5. Alam, Tasneem & Waheed, Muhammad, 2006. "The monetary transmission mechanism in Pakistan: a sectoral analysis," MPRA Paper 2719, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 13 Apr 2007.
  6. Matousek, Roman & Sarantis, Nicholas, 2009. "The bank lending channel and monetary transmission in Central and Eastern European countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 321-334, June.
  7. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Mastruzzi, Massimo, 2008. "Governance matters VII : aggregate and individual governance indicators 1996-2007," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4654, The World Bank.
  8. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "The Transmission Mechanism in Armenia: New Evidence from a Regime Switching VAR Analysis," IMF Working Papers 10/270, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2008. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Central and Eastern Europe: Surveying the Surveyable," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 654, OECD Publishing.
  10. David B. Gordon & Eric M. Leeper, 1993. "The dynamic impacts of monetary policy: an exercise in tentative identification," Working Paper 93-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. repec:imf:imfwpa:07/285 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Ramlogan, Carlyn., 2007. "Anism of monetary policy in small developing countries: an application to Trinidad and Tobago," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 41(1), pages 79-91, September.
  13. Robin Brooks & Kenneth Rogoff & Ashoka Mody & Nienke Oomes & Aasim M. Husain, 2004. "Evolution and Performance of Exchange Rate Regimes," IMF Occasional Papers 229, International Monetary Fund.
  14. Giorgi Bakradze & Andreas Billmeier, 2007. "Inflation Targeting in Georgia: Are We there Yet?," IMF Working Papers 07/193, International Monetary Fund.
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