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The Monetary Transmission in Dollarized and Non-Dollarized Economies; The Cases of Chile, New Zealand, Peru and Uruguay

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  • Santiago Acosta Ormaechea
  • David O Coble Fernandez

Abstract

The paper conducts a comparative study of the monetary policy transmission in two economies that run a well-established IT regime, Chile and New Zealand, vis-à-vis two economies operating under relatively newer IT regimes, and which are exposed to a significant degree of dollarization, Peru and Uruguay. It is shown that the traditional interest rate channel is effective in Chile and New Zealand. For Peru and Uruguay, the exchange rate channel is instead more relevant in the transmission of monetary policy. This latter result follows from the limited impact of the policy rate in curbing inflationary pressures in these two countries, in combination with the fact that they have a relatively large and persistent exchange rate pass through. Finally, it is shown that the on-going de-dollarization process of Peru and Uruguay has somewhat strengthened their monetary transmission through the interest rate channel.

Suggested Citation

  • Santiago Acosta Ormaechea & David O Coble Fernandez, 2011. "The Monetary Transmission in Dollarized and Non-Dollarized Economies; The Cases of Chile, New Zealand, Peru and Uruguay," IMF Working Papers 11/87, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/87
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kim, Soyoung & Roubini, Nouriel, 2000. "Exchange rate anomalies in the industrial countries: A solution with a structural VAR approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 561-586, June.
    2. Leonardo Leiderman & Rodolfo Maino & Eric Parrado, 2006. "Inflation Targeting in Dollarized Economies," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 368, Central Bank of Chile.
    3. Frederic S. Mishkin, 1996. "The Channels of Monetary Transmission: Lessons for Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 5464, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Peter J Montiel & Antonio Spilimbergo & Prachi Mishra, 2010. "Monetary Transmission in Low Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 10/223, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Peersman, Gert & Smets, Frank, 2001. "The monetary transmission mechanism in the euro area: more evidence from VAR analysis," Working Paper Series 0091, European Central Bank.
    6. Rossini, Renzo & Vega, Marco, 2007. "El mecanismo de transmisión de la política monetaria en un entorno de dolarización financiera: El caso del Perú entre 1996 y 2006," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 14, pages 11-32.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jamilov, Rustam, 2012. "Channels of Monetary Transmission in the CIS," MPRA Paper 39568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:mtp:titles:0262037165 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Stephanie Medina Cas & Alejandro Carrion-Menendez & Florencia Frantischek, 2011. "The Policy Interest-Rate Pass-Through in Central America," IMF Working Papers 11/240, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Keefe, Helena Glebocki & Rengifo, Erick W., 2015. "Options and central bank currency market intervention: The case of Colombia," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 1-25.
    5. Jorge David Quintero Otero, 2015. "Impactos de la política monetaria y canales de transmisión en países de América Latina con esquema de inflación objetivo," ENSAYOS SOBRE POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ESPE, vol. 33(76), pages 61-75, April.
    6. Osmar Jasan Bolívar Rosales, 2016. "Bolivianization And Effectiveness Of The Monetary Policy," Volúmenes de los Cuadernos de Investigacion Economica Boliviana publicados por el Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas 2016-2, Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Publicas de Bolivia.
    7. Aysun, Uluc & Brady, Ryan & Honig, Adam, 2013. "Financial frictions and the strength of monetary transmission," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 1097-1119.
    8. Mishra, Prachi & Montiel, Peter, 2013. "How effective is monetary transmission in low-income countries? A survey of the empirical evidence," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 187-216.
    9. Khundrakpam, Jeevan Kumar & Jain, Rajeev, 2012. "Monetary Policy Transmission in India: A Peep Inside the Black Box," MPRA Paper 50903, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Bruno Ćorić & Lena Malešević Perović & Vladimir Šimić, 2016. "Openness and the Strength of Monetary Transmission: International Evidence," Acta Oeconomica, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 66(4), pages 639-659, December.
    11. Helena Glebocki Keefe & Erick W. Rengifo, 2014. "Options and Central Banks Currency Market Intervention: The Case of Colombia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2014-06, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    12. Windischbauer, Ulrich, 2016. "Strengthening the role of local currencies in EU candidate and potential candidate countries," Occasional Paper Series 170, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central banks and their policies; Chile; Dollarization; New Zealand; Monetary policy; Peru; Uruguay; Monetary Policy Transmission; IT Regimes; inflation; central bank; money market; aggregate demand;

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