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Does Money Matter for Inflation in Ghana?

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  • Arto Kovanen

Abstract

Money has only limited information value for future inflation in Ghana over a typical monetary policy implementation horizon (four to eight quarters). On the other hand, currency depreciation and demand pressures (as measured by the output gap) are shown to be important predictors of future price changes. Inflation inertia is high and inflation expectations are largely based on backward-looking information, suggesting that inflation expectations are not well anchored and hence more is needed to strengthen the credibility of Ghana's inflation-targeting regime.1

Suggested Citation

  • Arto Kovanen, 2011. "Does Money Matter for Inflation in Ghana?," IMF Working Papers 11/274, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/274
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2006. "Three decades of money demand studies: differences and similarities," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(7), pages 805-818.
    2. Michael Scharnagl & Christina Gerberding & Franz Seitz, 2010. "Should Monetary Policy Respond to Money Growth? New Results for the Euro Area," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 409-441, Winter.
    3. Ghartey, Edward E., 1998. "Monetary dynamics in Ghana: evidence from cointegration, error correction modelling, and exogeneity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 473-486.
    4. Lance J. Bachmeier & Norman R. Swanson, 2005. "Predicting Inflation: Does The Quantity Theory Help?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(3), pages 570-585, July.
    5. Galina Hale & Òscar Jordà, 2007. "Do monetary aggregates help forecast inflation?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue apr13.
    6. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Abera Gelan, 2009. "How stable is the demand for money in African countries?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(3), pages 216-235, July.
    7. Alvaro Angeriz & Philip Arestis, 2007. "Assessing the Performance of 'Inflation Targeting Lite' Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(11), pages 1621-1645, November.
    8. Emil Stavrev & Helge Berger, 2012. "The information content of money in forecasting euro area inflation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(31), pages 4055-4072, November.
    9. Charles Freedman & Douglas Laxton, 2009. "Why Inflation Targeting?," IMF Working Papers 09/86, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Arto Kovanen & Jihad Dagher, 2011. "On the Stability of Money Demand in Ghana; A Bounds Testing Approach," IMF Working Papers 11/273, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Carare, Alina & Stone, Mark R., 2006. "Inflation targeting regimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1297-1315, July.
    12. Pradhan, Basanta K. & Subramanian, A., 2003. "On the stability of demand for money in a developing economy: Some empirical issues," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 335-351, October.
    13. Issing, Otmar, 2011. "Lessons for monetary policy: What should the consensus be?," CFS Working Paper Series 2011/13, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
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    Cited by:

    1. Shahid IQBAL & Maqbool H. SIAL, 2016. "Projections of Inflation Dynamics for Pakistan: GMDH Approach," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 536-559, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for money; Central banks and their policies; Money demand; Ghana; monetary policy credibility; inflation-targeting; inflation; monetary policy; real money; money stock;

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