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Shocks, Financial Dependence, and Efficiency; Evidence From U.S. and Canadian Industries

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  • Marcello M. Estevão
  • Tiago Severo

Abstract

The paper investigates how changes in industries' funding costs affect total factor productivity (TFP) growth. Based on panel regressions using 31 U.S. and Canadian industries between 1991 and 2007, and using industries' dependence on external funding as an identification mechanism, we show that increases in the cost of funds have a statistically significant and economically meaningful negative impact on TFP growth. This effect is, however, non-monotonic across sectors with different degrees of dependence on external finance. Our findings cannot be explained by either increasing returns to scale or factor hoarding, as results are not sensitive to controlling for industry size and our calculations account for changes in factor utilization. The paper presents a theoretical model that produces the observed non-monotonic effect of financial shocks on TFP growth and suggests that financial shocks distort the allocation of factors across firms even within an industry, thus reducing TFP growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcello M. Estevão & Tiago Severo, 2011. "Shocks, Financial Dependence, and Efficiency; Evidence From U.S. and Canadian Industries," IMF Working Papers 11/199, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. F. Arizala & E. Cavallo & A. Galindo, 2013. "Financial development and TFP growth: cross-country and industry-level evidence," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 433-448, March.
    2. Campbell, John Y & Shiller, Robert J, 1988. " Stock Prices, Earnings, and Expected Dividends," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(3), pages 661-676, July.
    3. Neumeyer, Pablo A. & Perri, Fabrizio, 2005. "Business cycles in emerging economies: the role of interest rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 345-380, March.
    4. J. Bradford De Long, "undated". "`Liquidation' Cycles: Old-Fashioned Real Business Cycle Theory and the Great Depression," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _135, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
    5. Matías Braun & Borja Larrain, 2005. "Finance and the Business Cycle: International, Inter-Industry Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(3), pages 1097-1128, June.
    6. Timothy J. Kehoe & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Great Depressions of the Twentieth Century," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, January.
    7. Timothy J. Kehoe & Edward C. Prescott(), 2007. "Great depressions of the twentieth century," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, number 2007gdott.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sangeeta Pratap & Carlos Urrutia & Felipe Meza, 2017. "Credit, Misallocation and Productivity Growth: A Disaggregated Analysis," 2017 Meeting Papers 538, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Canada; Business cycles; Total factor productivity; United States; financial shocks; tfp; calibration; equation; probability; Macroeconomics: Production; Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy;

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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