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Oil Shocks in a Global Perspective; Are they Really That Bad?


  • Tobias N. Rasmussen
  • Agustin Roitman


Using a comprehensive global dataset, we outline stylized facts characterizing relationships between crude oil prices and macroeconomic developments across the world. Approaching the data from several angles, we find that the impact of higher oil prices on oil-importing economies is generally small: a 25 percent increase in oil prices typically causes GDP to fall by about half of one percent or less. While cross-country differences in impact are found to depend mainly on the relative size of oil imports, we also show that oil price shocks are not always costly for oil-importing countries: although higher oil prices increase the import bill, there are partly offsetting increases in external receipts. We provide a small open economy model illustrating the main transmission channels of oil shocks, and show how the recycling of petrodollars may mitigate the impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Tobias N. Rasmussen & Agustin Roitman, 2011. "Oil Shocks in a Global Perspective; Are they Really That Bad?," IMF Working Papers 11/194, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/194

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kallis, Giorgos & Sager, Jalel, 2017. "Oil and the economy: A systematic review of the literature for ecological economists," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 561-571.
    2. Martin Stürmer, 2013. "150 Years of Boom and Bust: What Drives Mineral Commodity Prices?," 2013 Papers pst529, Job Market Papers.
    3. Michele Ruta & Anthony J. Venables, 2012. "International Trade in Natural Resources: Practice and Policy," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 331-352, August.
    4. Alfred Haug & Syed Basher & Perry Sadorsky, 2016. "The impact of oil price shocks on exchange rates: A non-linear smooth-transition approach," EcoMod2016 9226, EcoMod.
    5. Kumar, S. & Shrestha, Pujan & Abdul Salam, P., 2013. "A review of biofuel policies in the major biofuel producing countries of ASEAN: Production, targets, policy drivers and impacts," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 822-836.
    6. Allegret, Jean-Pierre & Mignon, Valérie & Sallenave, Audrey, 2015. "Oil price shocks and global imbalances: Lessons from a model with trade and financial interdependencies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 232-247.
    7. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2013. "Structural Reforms and Growth in Transition: A Meta-Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1057, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    8. Rigoberto Ariel Yépez-García & Luis San Vicente Portes & Luis Enrique García, 2013. "Planning for Higher Oil Prices : Power Sector Impact in Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17547, The World Bank.
    9. repec:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:256-270 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Olcay Yucel Culha & Mustafa Utku Ozmen & Erdal Yilmaz, 2015. "Petrol Fiyatlarinin Ihracat Uzerindeki Etkisi," CBT Research Notes in Economics 1510, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    11. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2014. "Structural reforms and growth in transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(1), pages 13-42, January.
    12. Claudio Morana, 2013. "The Oil Price-Macroeconomy Relationship Since the Mid-1980s: A Global Perspective," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    13. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Sarwar, Suleman & Chen, Wei & Malik, Muhammad Nasir, 2017. "Dynamics of electricity consumption, oil price and economic growth: Global perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 256-270.
    14. James D. Hamilton, 2013. "Oil prices, exhaustible resources and economic growth," Chapters,in: Handbook on Energy and Climate Change, chapter 1, pages 29-63 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Hassan, Syeda Anam & Zaman, Khalid, 2012. "Effect of oil prices on trade balance: New insights into the cointegration relationship from Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2125-2143.
    16. Basher, Syed Abul & Haug, Alfred A. & Sadorsky, Perry, 2016. "The impact of oil shocks on exchange rates: A Markov-switching approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-23.
    17. Arlan Brucal & Michael Abrigo, 2017. "Can Cheap Oil Hurt Net Importers? Evidence from the Philippines," Working Papers id:12323, eSocialSciences.
    18. James D. Hamilton, 2012. "Oil Prices, Exhaustible Resources, and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 17759, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-441 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Maurizio Michael Habib & Sascha Bützer & Livio Stracca, 2016. "Global Exchange Rate Configurations: Do Oil Shocks Matter?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 443-470, August.
    21. Lamazoshvili Beka, 2014. "Effects of Oil Shocks on Oil-Importing Developing Economies: The Case of Georgia and Armenia," EERC Working Paper Series 14/06e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    22. World Bank Group, 2015. "Global Economic Prospects, January 2015 : Having Fiscal Space and Using It," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20758, June.
    23. Wang, Qiang & Li, Rongrong, 2016. "Impact of cheaper oil on economic system and climate change: A SWOT analysis," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 925-931.
    24. Shiyi Chen & Dengke Chen & Wolfgang K. Härdle, 2014. "The Influence of Oil Price Shocks on China’s Macroeconomy : A Perspective of International Trade," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-063, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.


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