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Economic Policies and FDI Inflows to Emerging Market Economies

  • Elif Arbatli

This paper investigates the determinants of FDI inflows to emerging market economies, concentrating on the effects of economic policies. The empirical analysis also addresses the role of external push factors and of political stability using a domestic conflict events database. The results suggest that lowering corporate tax rates and trade tariffs, adopting fixed or managed exchange rate policies and eliminating FDI related capital controls have played an important role. Domestic conflict events and political instability are found to have significant negative effects on FDI, which highlights the role of incluside policies to promote growth and avoid sudden stops of FDI inflows.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 11/192.

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Length: 25
Date of creation: 01 Aug 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/192
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  1. Kose, M. Ayhan & Prasad, Eswar S. & Taylor, Ashley D., 2009. "Thresholds in the process of international financial integration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5149, The World Bank.
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  3. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Vadym Volosovych, 2007. "Capital Flows in a Globalized World: The Role of Policies and Institutions," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 19-72 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Laura Alfaro & Selin Sayek & Areendam Chanda, 2002. "FDI and Economic Growth: The Role of Local Financial Markets," Macroeconomics 0212007, EconWPA.
  8. Alexander Klemm & Stefan van Parys, 2009. "Empirical Evidenceon the Effects of Tax Incentives," IMF Working Papers 09/136, International Monetary Fund.
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  11. Campos, Nauro F & Kinoshita, Yuko, 2003. "Why Does FDI Go Where it Goes? New Evidence from the Transitional Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3984, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Marcin Piatkowski & Mariusz Jarmuzek, 2008. "Zero Corporate Income Tax in Moldova; Tax Competition and its Implications for Eastern Europe," IMF Working Papers 08/203, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong Wha, 2013. "A new data set of educational attainment in the world, 1950–2010," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 184-198.
  14. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1994. "Inflows of Capital to Developing Countries in the 1990s: Causes and Effects," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 5718, Inter-American Development Bank.
  15. Devereux, Michael P. & Lockwood, Ben & Redoano, Michela, 2008. "Do countries compete over corporate tax rates?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1210-1235, June.
  16. Sebastian Edwards, 2007. "Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number edwa06-1, October.
  17. Jiangyan Yu & James P Walsh, 2010. "Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment; A Sectoral and Institutional Approach," IMF Working Papers 10/187, International Monetary Fund.
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