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Revenue Administration Reforms in anglophone Africa Since the Early 1990's


  • David Kloeden


Despite positive but mixed progress over two decades, most lower income African countries need to enhance their low tax-to-GDP ratios by mobilizing domestic resources to complement debt relief, donor aid and to achieve the MDG and poverty reduction objectives. With these goals in mind, most African countries have undertaken revenue administration reforms and from the early 1990s, 16 of 19 Anglophone Africa countries established some form of revenue authority (RA) for greater governance, financing, and workforce autonomy. Changes in governance and HR practices are evident, but has revenue administration improved overall? Capacity limitations and integrity issues persist. The introduction of VAT heralded self-assessment, but in most instances without being integrated with income tax administration. Rather, VAT administration was assigned to a separate department. Special units for large taxpayers are now common following initial challenges, but programs for other taxpayer segments are still emerging.

Suggested Citation

  • David Kloeden, 2011. "Revenue Administration Reforms in anglophone Africa Since the Early 1990's," IMF Working Papers 11/162, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/162

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2013. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 570-615, August.
    2. Justin O Zake, 2011. "Customs Administration Reform and Modernization in anglophone Africa; Early 1990's to Mid-2010," IMF Working Papers 11/184, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Maureen Kidd & William Joseph Crandall, 2006. "Revenue Authorities; Issues and Problems in Evaluating their Success," IMF Working Papers 06/240, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Mario Mansour & Michael Keen, 2009. "Revenue Mobilization in Sub-Saharan Africa; Challenges from Globalization," IMF Working Papers 09/157, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher S Adam & David Bevan, 2014. "Public Investment, Public Finance, and Growth; The Impact of Distortionary Taxation, Recurrent Costs, and Incomplete Appropriability," IMF Working Papers 14/73, International Monetary Fund.


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