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Business Cycles in Emerging Markets: The Role of Durable Goods and Financial Frictions

This paper examines how durable goods and financial frictions shape the business cycle of a small open economy subject to shocks to trend and transitory shocks. In the data, nondurable consumption is not as volatile as income for both developed and emerging market economies. The simulation of the model implies that shocks to trend play a less important role than previously documented. Financial frictions improve the ability of the model to match some key business cycle properties of emerging economies. A countercyclical borrowing premium interacts with the nature of durable goods delivering highly volatile consumption and very countercyclical net exports.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 11/133.

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Length: 38
Date of creation: 01 Jun 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:11/133
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  8. Emine Boz & Christian Daude & C. Bora Durdu, 2011. "Emerging Market Business Cycles Revisited: Learning about the Trend," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1110, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  9. José De Gregorio & Pablo E. Guidotti & Carlos A. Végh, 1998. "Inflation Stabilization and the Consumption of Durable Goods," Documentos de Trabajo 26, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  10. Gali, Jordi, 1993. "Variability of Durable and Nondurable Consumption: Evidence for Six O.E.C.D. Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(3), pages 418-28, August.
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  17. Mendoza, Enrique G, 1991. "Real Business Cycles in a Small Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 797-818, September.
  18. Patrick J. Kehoe & Timothy J. Kehoe, 1994. "A primer on static applied general equilibrium models," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 2-16.
  19. Aguiar, Mark & Gopinath, Gita, 2007. "Emerging Market Business Cycles: The Cycle is the Trend," Scholarly Articles 11988098, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  20. Eaton, Jonathan & Gersovitz, Mark, 1981. "Debt with Potential Repudiation: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 289-309, April.
  21. Baxter, Marianne, 1996. "Are Consumer Durables Important for Business Cycles?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 147-55, February.
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