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Risk and the Corporate Structure of Banks

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  • International Monetary Fund

Abstract

We identify different sources of risk as important determinants of banks' corporate structures when expanding into new markets. Subsidiary-based corporate structures benefit from greater protection against economic risk because of affiliate-level limited liability, but are more exposed to the risk of capital expropriation than are branches. Thus, branch-based structures are preferred to subsidiary-based structures when expropriation risk is high relative to economic risk, and vice versa. Greater cross-country risk correlation and more accurate pricing of risk by investors reduce the differences between the two structures. Furthermore, the corporate structure affects bank risk taking and affiliate size.

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  • International Monetary Fund, 2010. "Risk and the Corporate Structure of Banks," IMF Working Papers 10/40, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/40
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    Cited by:

    1. M. Levati & Jianying Qiu & Prashanth Mahagaonkar, 2012. "Testing the Modigliani-Miller theorem directly in the lab," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 15(4), pages 693-716, December.
    2. Gambacorta, Leonardo & Schiaffi, Stefano & van Rixtel, Adrian, 2017. "Changing business models in international bank funding," CEPR Discussion Papers 11957, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Diemo Dietrich & Uwe Vollmer, 2010. "International Banking and Liquidity Allocation," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 37(1), pages 45-69, February.
    4. Curi, Claudia & Lozano-Vivas, Ana & Zelenyuk, Valentin, 2015. "Foreign bank diversification and efficiency prior to and during the financial crisis: Does one business model fit all?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(S1), pages 22-35.
    5. Eugenio M Cerutti, 2013. "Banks’ Foreign Credit Exposures and Borrowers’ Rollover Risks Measurement, Evolution and Determinants," IMF Working Papers 13/9, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Niepmann, Friederike, 2015. "Banking across borders," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 244-265.
    7. Dell'Ariccia, Giovanni & Laeven, Luc & Marquez, Robert, 2010. "Monetary Policy, Leverage, and Bank Risk-Taking," Working Papers 11-05, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    8. Torsten Ehlers & Philip D Wooldridge, 2015. "Channels and determinants of foreign bank lending," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Cross-border Financial Linkages: Challenges for Monetary Policy and Financial Stability, volume 82, pages 29-68 Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Tatsuo Ushijima, 2016. "Diversification, Organization, and Value of the Firm," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 45(2), pages 467-499, May.
    10. Diemo Dietrich & Tobias Knedlik & Axel Lindner, 2011. "Central and Eastern European countries in the global financial crisis: a typical twin crisis?," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 415-432, April.
    11. Elisa Luciano & Clas Wihlborg, 2013. "The Organization of Bank Affiliates; A Theoretical Perspective on Risk and Efficiency," ICER Working Papers 06-2013, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    12. Annick Pamen Nyola & Alain Sauviat & Amine Tarazi, 2017. "How Does Regulation Affect the Organizational Form of Banks' Presence in Developing and Developed Countries?," Working Papers hal-01369658, HAL.
    13. Lin, Jane-Raung & Chung, Huimin & Hsieh, Ming-Hsiang & Wu, Soushan, 2012. "The determinants of interest margins and their effect on bank diversification: Evidence from Asian banks," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 96-106.
    14. Cerutti, Eugenio, 2015. "Drivers of cross-border banking exposures during the crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 340-357.
    15. Maier, Ulf, 2016. "Multinational banks: Supranational resolution regimes and the importance of capital regulation," Discussion Papers in Economics 29630, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    16. Danisewicz, Piotr & Reinhardt, Dennis & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon, 2015. "On a tight leash: does bank organisational structure matter for macroprudential spillovers?," Bank of England working papers 524, Bank of England.
    17. repec:zbw:iwhdps:18-06 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. repec:eee:inecon:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:174-194 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Elisa Luciano & Clas Wihlborg, 2013. "Financial synergies and the Organization of Bank Affiliates; A Theoretical Perspective on Risk and Efficiency," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 322, Collegio Carlo Alberto, revised 2014.
    20. Dominika Langenmayr & Franz Reiter, 2017. "Trading Offshore: Evidence on Banks' Tax Avoidance," CESifo Working Paper Series 6664, CESifo Group Munich.
    21. Fang, Yiwei & van Lelyveld, Iman, 2014. "Geographic diversification in banking," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 172-181.

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