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Mother, Can I Trust the Government? Sustained Financial Deepening; A Political Institutionsview

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  • Marc G Quintyn
  • Genevieve Verdier

Abstract

Only a minority of countries have succeeded in establishing a developed financial system, despite widespread financial liberalization. Confronted with this finding, the political institutions view claims that sustained financial deepening is most likely to take place in institutional environments where governments effectively impose constraints on their own powers in order to create trust. This paper identifies over 200 post-1960 episodes of accelerations in financial development in a large cross-section of countries. We find that the likelihood of an acceleration leading to sustained financial development increases greatly in environments that have high-quality political institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc G Quintyn & Genevieve Verdier, 2010. "Mother, Can I Trust the Government? Sustained Financial Deepening; A Political Institutionsview," IMF Working Papers 10/210, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/210
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Badi H. Baltagi & Panicos O. Demetriades & Siong Hook Law, 2007. "Financial Development, Openness and Institutions: Evidence from Panel Data," WEF Working Papers 0022, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
    2. Kangni Kpodar & Raju Jan Singh & Dhaneshwar Ghura, 2009. "Financial Deepening in the CFA Franc Zone: The Role of Institutions," Post-Print hal-00450079, HAL.
    3. Hauner, David, 2009. "Public debt and financial development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 171-183, January.
    4. Kaminsky, Graciela Laura & Schmukler, Sergio L., 2002. "Short-run pain, long-run gain : the effects of financial liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2912, The World Bank.
    5. Bordo, Michael D. & Rousseau, Peter L., 2006. "Legal-political factors and the historical evolution of the finance-growth link," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(03), pages 421-444, December.
    6. Thorsten Beck & Ross Levine, 2003. "Legal institutions and financial development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3136, The World Bank.
    7. Addison, Tony & Chowdhury, Abdur R. & Murshed, S. Mansoob, 2002. "By How Much Does Conflict Reduce Financial Development?," WIDER Working Paper Series 048, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Raghuram Rajan & Luigi Zingales, 2003. "The Emergence of Strong Property Rights: Speculation from history," NBER Working Papers 9478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Degryse, Hans & Lambert, Thomas & Schwienbacher, Armin, 2013. "The Political Economy of Financial Systems: Evidence from Suffrage Reforms in the Last Two Centuries," CEPR Discussion Papers 9621, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. repec:eee:finsta:v:29:y:2017:i:c:p:13-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Marc G Quintyn & Sophia Gollwitzer, 2012. "Institutional Transformations, Polity and Economic Outcomes; Testing the North-Wallis-Weingast Doorsteps Framework," IMF Working Papers 12/87, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Stephen H. Haber & Aldo Musacchio, 2013. "These Are the Good Old Days: Foreign Entry and the Mexican Banking System," NBER Working Papers 18713, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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