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Measuring Financial Barriers Among East African Community Countries


  • Yi David Wang


This paper seeks to quantify existing financial barriers among East African Community (EAC) member countries based on analysis of each member country’s foreign exchange market. The primary contribution of this paper is the generation of an aggregate measure of financial barriers for the three relatively more advanced members (Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania) using forward foreign exchange and interbank interest rate data. Its empirical results, which are corroborated by other evidence such as the levels of development of the financial markets and restrictions on capital flows, suggest that Kenya is the EAC’s most financially open country, followed by Uganda, and then Tanzania. The fact that the three countries exhibit different degrees of financial openness suggests that financial integration in the EAC region has a way to go.

Suggested Citation

  • Yi David Wang, 2010. "Measuring Financial Barriers Among East African Community Countries," IMF Working Papers 10/194, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/194

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Reinhart, Carmen M. & Reinhart, Vincent R., 2011. "Entrada de capitales y acumulación de reservas: evidencia reciente," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 20, pages 15-25.
    2. Salas, Jorge, 2010. "Bayesian Estimation of a Simple Macroeconomic Model for a Small Open and Partially Dollarized Economy," Working Papers 2010-007, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    3. Seth B. Carpenter & Jane E. Ihrig & Elizabeth C. Klee & Daniel W. Quinn & Alexander H. Boote, 2013. "The Federal Reserve's balance sheet and earnings: a primer and projections," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-01, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Carl E. Walsh, 2009. "Inflation Targeting: What Have We Learned?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(2), pages 195-233, August.
    5. Marco Bonomo & Ricardo Brito & Bruno Martins, 2015. "Macroeconomic and Financial Consequences of the Post-Crisis Government-Driven Credit Expansion in Brazil," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6827, Inter-American Development Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Albert Mafusire & Zuzana Brixiova, 2012. "Working Paper 156 - Macroeconomic Shock Synchronization in the East African Community," Working Paper Series 432, African Development Bank.
    2. Masafumi Yabara, 2014. "Assessing exchange rate dynamics of East Africa: fragmented or integrated?," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 154-174, March.
    3. Wang, Yi David, 2015. "Convertibility restriction in China’s foreign exchange market and its impact on forward pricing," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 616-631.
    4. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:1244-1253 is not listed on IDEAS


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