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China; Does Government Health and Education Spending Boost Consumption?

Author

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  • Steven A Barnett
  • Ray Brooks

Abstract

Consumption in China is unusually low and has continued to decline as a share of GDP over the past decade. A key policy question is how to reverse this trend, and rebalance growth away from reliance on exports and investment and toward consumption. This paper investigates whether the sizable increase in government social spending in recent years lowered precautionary saving and increased consumption. The main findings are that spending on health, but not education, had an impact on household behavior. The impact, moreover, is large. A one yuan increase in government health spending is associated with a two yuan increase in urban household consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven A Barnett & Ray Brooks, 2010. "China; Does Government Health and Education Spending Boost Consumption?," IMF Working Papers 10/16, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/16
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    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=23533
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcos D. Chamon & Eswar S. Prasad, 2010. "Why Are Saving Rates of Urban Households in China Rising?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 93-130, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Halvor Mehlum & Ragnar Torvik & Simone Valente, 2013. "China’s Savings Multiplier," Working Papers No 4/2013, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    2. Riccardo Cristadoro & Daniela Marconi, 2012. "Household savings in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 275-299, November.
    3. Christian Dreger & Tongsan Wang & Yanqun Zhang, 2015. "Understanding Chinese Consumption: The Impact of Hukou," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 46(6), pages 1331-1344, November.
    4. Cheung, Diana & Padieu, Ysaline, 2011. "Impact of Health Insurance on Consumption and Saving Behaviours: Evidence from Rural China," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 18, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    5. Atella, Vincenzo & Brugiavini, Agar & Pace, Noemi, 2015. "The health care system reform in China: Effects on out-of-pocket expenses and saving," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 182-195.
    6. Dorrucci, Ettore & Pula, Gabor & Santabárbara, Daniel, 2013. "China's economic growth and rebalancing," Occasional Paper Series 142, European Central Bank.
    7. repec:taf:ceasxx:v:67:y:2015:i:9:p:1351-1370 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Clovis Kerdrain & Isabell Koske & Isabelle Wanner, 2011. "Current Account Imbalances: can Structural Reforms Help to Reduce Them?," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2011(1), pages 1-44.
    9. Zaiter Lahimer, Mahjouba, 2011. "L’impact des entrées de capitaux privés sur la croissance économique dans les pays en développement," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/7670 edited by Sterdyniak, Henri.
    10. Döhrn, Roland & an de Meulen, Philipp & Kitlinski, Tobias & Schmidt, Torsten & Vosen, Simeon, 2010. "Die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung im Ausland: Der erste Schwung ist vorüber," RWI Konjunkturberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, vol. 61(2), pages 5-36.
    11. Roland Döhrn & Philipp an de Meulen & Tobias Kitlinski & Torsten Schmidt & Simeon Vosen, 2010. "Die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung im Ausland zur Jahresmitte 2010 - Der erste Schwung ist vorüber," RWI Konjunkturbericht, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, pages 32, 09.

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