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FDI Flows to Low-Income Countries; Global Drivers and Growth Implications

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  • International Monetary Fund

Abstract

What accounts for variations in FDI flows from advanced to developing countries? How have FDI inflows explained cross-country growth experiences? In this paper we tackle both these questions empirically for a large sample of middle and low-income countries. Two key results emerge: (i) lower borrowing costs and positive real-side external factors were increasingly important drivers of FDI outflows to low-income countries in the pre-crisis period; (ii) economic fundamentals, the strength of economic reforms, and commitment to macroeconomic discipline are crucial determinants of the growth dividends of FDI. Our paper suggests that low-income countries can turn to domestic policy solutions to mitigate the adverse effects of a potential decline in FDI in the post-crisis world.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 2010. "FDI Flows to Low-Income Countries; Global Drivers and Growth Implications," IMF Working Papers 10/132, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/132
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudiu Albulescu & Adrian Ionescu, 2017. "The long-run impact of monetary policy uncertainty and banking stability on inward FDI in EU countries," Working Papers hal-01503950, HAL.
    2. Shah, Mumtaz Hussain, 2016. "Financial development and foreign direct investment: The case of Middle East and North African (MENA) developing nations," MPRA Paper 82013, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Montfort Mlachila & Misa Takebe, 2011. "FDI from BRICs to LICs; Emerging Growth Driver?," IMF Working Papers 11/178, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Chris Papageorgiou & Andrew Berg & Catherine A Pattillo & Nicola Spatafora, 2010. "The End of An Era? the Medium- and Long-Term Effects of the Global Crisison Growth in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 10/205, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Christoph A. Schaltegger & Martin Weder, 2010. "Are Fiscal Adjustments Bad for Investment?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2010-17, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    6. Ndambendia, Houdou, 2015. "Africa trade and investment with BRIC nations in a changing economic landscape: the role of China," MPRA Paper 71675, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Era Dabla-Norris & Camelia Minoiu & Luis-Felipe Zanna, 2010. "Business Cycle Fluctuations, Large Shocks, and Development Aid; New Evidence," IMF Working Papers 10/240, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Alessia Amighini & Chiara Franco, 2012. "Agglomeration Effects in South-South FDI," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_032, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    9. International Monetary Fund, 2011. "Montenegro; 2011 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Public Information Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Montenegro," IMF Staff Country Reports 11/100, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Chen, Ping-ho & Lai, Ching-chong & Chu, Hsun, 2016. "Welfare effects of tourism-driven Dutch disease: The roles of international borrowings and factor intensity," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 381-394.
    11. Samake, Issouf & Yang, Yongzheng, 2014. "Low-income countries’ linkages to BRICS: Are there growth spillovers?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 1-14.
    12. Jayasuriya, Dinuk, 2011. "Improvements in the World Bank's ease of doing business rankings : do they translate into greater foreign direct investment inflows ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5787, The World Bank.

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