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Investment-Specific Productivity Growth - Chile in a Global Perspective

  • Gabriel Di Bella
  • Martin Cerisola

By the end of 2007, Chile's total factor productivity was lower than ten years earlier, a performance that contrasted sharply with the previous decade, when productivity grew by a cumulative 30 percent. This paper assesses productivity trends in Chile, by decomposing productivity into investment-specific technological change (associated with improvements in the quality of capital) and neutral technological change (related to the organization of productive activities). It concludes that investment-specific technological improvements have contributed significantly to long-term growth in Chile, in line with trends observed in other net commodity exporters, while neutral technological change has been slow.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 09/264.

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Length: 16
Date of creation: 01 Dec 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:09/264
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  1. Greenwood, J. & Hercowitz, Z. & Krusell, P., 1996. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," RCER Working Papers 420, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Martin D. Cerisola & Jorge A Chan-Lau, 2000. "Tales From Two Neighbors; Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States," IMF Working Papers 00/169, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Zilibotti, Fabrizio & Aghion, Philippe & Acemoglu, Daron, 2006. "Distance to Frontier, Selection, and Economic Growth," Scholarly Articles 4554122, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Robert J. Gordon, 2003. "Exploding Productivity Growth: Context, Causes, and Implications," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 207-298.
  5. Andreas Hornstein & Per Krusell, 1996. "Can Technology Improvements Cause Productivity Slowdowns?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1996, Volume 11, pages 209-276 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. repec:ucp:bknber:9780226304557 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Jorge E. Restrepo, 2008. "Estimaciones de NAIRU para Chile," Investigación Conjunta - español, in: Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos (CEMLA) (ed.), Estimación y Uso de Variables no Observables en la Región, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 492-516 Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos, CEMLA.
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