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Global Market Conditions and Systemic Risk


  • Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo
  • Heiko Hesse


This paper examines several key global market conditions, such as a proxy for market uncertainty and measures of interbank funding stress, to assess financial volatility and the likelihood of crisis. Using Markov regime-switching techniques, it shows that the Lehman Brothers failure was a watershed event in the crisis, although signs of heightened systemic risk could be detected as early as February 2007. In addition, we analyze the role of global market conditions to help determine when governments should begin to exit their extraordinary public support measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo & Heiko Hesse, 2009. "Global Market Conditions and Systemic Risk," IMF Working Papers 09/230, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:09/230

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2009. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2201-2238, June.
    2. Nathaniel Frank & Heiko Hesse, 2009. "Financial Spillovers to Emerging Markets during the Global Financial Crisis," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(6), pages 507-521, December.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2009. "How to Stop a Herd of Running Bears? Market Response to Policy Initiatives during the Global Financial Crisis," IMF Working Papers 09/204, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Illing, Mark & Liu, Ying, 2006. "Measuring financial stress in a developed country: An application to Canada," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 243-265, October.
    6. Daniel C. Hardy & Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, 1999. "Determinants and Leading Indicators of Banking Crises: Further Evidence," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 46(3), pages 1-1.
    7. Hamilton, James D. & Susmel, Raul, 1994. "Autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity and changes in regime," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1-2), pages 307-333.
    8. Heiko Hesse & Nathaniel Frank & Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo, 2008. "Transmission of Liquidity Shocks; Evidence from the 2007 Subprime Crisis," IMF Working Papers 08/200, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Dornbusch, Rudiger & Park, Yung Chul & Claessens, Stijn, 2000. "Contagion: Understanding How It Spreads," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(2), pages 177-197, August.
    10. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "The Determinants of Banking Crises in Developing and Developed Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(1), pages 81-109, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eugenio Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Patrick McGuire, 2012. "Systemic Risks in Global Banking: What Available Data Can Tell Us and What More Data Are Needed?," NBER Chapters,in: Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling, pages 235-260 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kim, Myeong Hyeon & Kim, Baeho, 2014. "Systematic cyclicality of systemic bubbles: Evidence from the U.S. commercial banking system," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 281-297.
    3. Eugenio Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Patrick McGuire, 2012. "Systemic risk in global banking: what can available data tell us and what more data are needed?," BIS Working Papers 376, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Dufrénot, Gilles & Mignon, Valérie & Péguin-Feissolle, Anne, 2011. "The effects of the subprime crisis on the Latin American financial markets: An empirical assessment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 2342-2357, September.
    5. Basher, Syed Abul & Haug, Alfred A. & Sadorsky, Perry, 2017. "The impact of oil-market shocks on stock returns in major oil-exporting countries: A Markov-switching approach," MPRA Paper 81638, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Neaime, Simon, 2016. "Financial crises and contagion vulnerability of MENA stock markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 14-35.
    7. Rainer Masera, 2011. "Taking the moral hazard out of banking: the next fundamental step in financial reform," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 64(257), pages 105-142.
    8. Kim, Bong-Han & Kim, Hyeongwoo & Lee, Bong-Soo, 2015. "Spillover effects of the U.S. financial crisis on financial markets in emerging Asian countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 192-210.
    9. González-Hermosillo, Brenda & Johnson, Christian, 2017. "Transmission of financial stress in Europe: The pivotal role of Italy and Spain, but not Greece," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 49-64.
    10. Irfan Akbar Kazi & Hakimzadi Wagan, 2014. "Are emerging markets exposed to contagion from U.S.: Evidence from stock and sovereign bond markets," Working Papers 2014-58, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    11. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-058 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Stefano Fenoaltea, 2010. "The reconstruction of historical national accounts: the case of Italy," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 63(252), pages 77-96.
    13. Naohiko Baba & Ilhyock Shim, 2011. "Dislocations in the won-dollar swap markets during the crisis of 2007-09," BIS Working Papers 344, Bank for International Settlements.
    14. Sari, Ramazan & Soytas, Ugur & Hacihasanoglu, Erk, 2011. "Do global risk perceptions influence world oil prices?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 515-524, May.
    15. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:228-239 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:ipg:wpaper:201417 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Xiao Jing Cai & Shuairu Tian & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2016. "Dynamic correlation and equicorrelation analysis of global financial turmoil: evidence from emerging East Asian stock markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(40), pages 3789-3803, August.
    18. Csontó, Balázs, 2014. "Emerging market sovereign bond spreads and shifts in global market sentiment," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 58-74.

    More about this item


    Financial risk; Financial systems; Economic models; Financial crisis; Emerging markets; Banking sector; Developing countries; Central bank policy; Currency swaps; Fiscal policy; Nonbank financial sector; International capital markets; Risk management; Systemic risk; Global Financial Crises; Subprime Crisis; Volatility; Solvency; Markov-Switching; financial institutions; financial system; contagion; Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models: Time-Series Models; Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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