IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Broad Money Demand and Asset Substitution in China

  • Ge Wu
Registered author(s):

    Recent changes to China's financial system, in particular ongoing interest rate liberalization, gradual movement toward a more flexible exchange rate regime, and rapid development of capital markets, have changed substantially the environment in which monetary policy operates. In light of these changes, we estimate an error correction model using a General-to-Specific methodology and confirm that a stable broad money demand function exists taking proper account of asset substitution, with an income elasticity of less than unity. Current inflation is found to have a significant negative impact on the real money demand. However, money demand does not appear very sensitive to interest rates, possibly reflecting their partial liberalization. Changes in the exchange rate also do not affect money demand significantly, but expectations of a further renminbi appreciation since 2005 appears to induce more money demand. Stock prices are statistically insignificant despite recent investors' interest in equity markets.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=23038
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 09/131.

    as
    in new window

    Length: 30
    Date of creation: 01 Jun 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:09/131
    Contact details of provider: Postal: International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC USA
    Phone: (202) 623-7000
    Fax: (202) 623-4661
    Web page: http://www.imf.org/external/pubind.htm
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/pubs/ord_info.htm

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Sunil Sharma & Neil R. Ericsson, 1998. "Broad money demand and financial liberalization in Greece," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 417-436.
    2. Gordon de Brouwer & Neil R. Ericsson, 1995. "Modelling Inflation in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp9510, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    3. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    4. Taylor, M P, 1986. "From the General to the Specific: The Demand for M2 in Three," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 243-61.
    5. Chen, Baizhu, 1997. "Long-Run Money Demand and Inflation in China," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 609-617, July.
    6. H. Yamada, 2000. "M2 demand relation and effective exchange rate in Japan: a cointegration analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 229-232.
    7. Feltenstein, Andrew & Ha, Jiming, 1992. "The link between macroeconomic adjustment and sectoral output in post-reform China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 109-124.
    8. Johansen, S., 1991. "Testing Weak Exogeneity and the Order of Cointegration in UK Money Demand Data," Papers 78, Helsinki - Department of Economics.
    9. Feltenstein, Andrew & Farhadian, Ziba, 1987. "Fiscal Policy, Monetary Targets, and the Price Level in a Centrally Planned Economy: An Application to the Case of China," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 137-56, May.
    10. Subramanian S. Sriram, 2001. "A Survey of Recent Empirical Money Demand Studies," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(3), pages 3.
    11. Yu, Qiao & Tsui, Albert K., 2000. "Monetary services and money demand in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 134-148, December.
    12. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-80, November.
    13. Yi, Gang, 1993. " Towards Estimating the Demand for Money in China," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 243-70.
    14. Girardin, Eric, 1996. " Is There a Long Run Demand for Currency in China?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 169-84.
    15. Hafer R. W. & Kutan A. M., 1993. "Further Evidence on Money, Output, and Prices in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 701-709, September.
    16. Ma, Guonan, 1993. "Macroeconomic disequilibrium, structural changes, and the household savings and money demand in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 115-136, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:09/131. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow)

    or (Hassan Zaidi)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.