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Central Bank Financial Strength, Policy Constraints and Inflation

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  • Peter Stella

Abstract

Central bank financial strength is positively associated with good policy performance. Financially weak central banks generate losses which undermine macroeconomic stability and call into question the credibility of their policies. In assessing central bank financial strength a careful examination of the policy regime and the volatility of the economic environment is necessary. Conventional measures of private enterprise financial strength- profitability and capital-can be very misleading when applied to central banks. The way in which a central bank balance sheet is strengthened matters. Providing the central bank with marketable government debt that can be used to develop a money market that in turn may become the locus of central bank monetary operations serves both to directly strengthen the institution and improve the quality of the environment in which it operates, thereby facilitating the attainment of its ultimate performance objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Stella, 2008. "Central Bank Financial Strength, Policy Constraints and Inflation," IMF Working Papers 08/49, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/49
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Stella & Ulrich H Klueh, 2008. "Central Bank Financial Strength and Policy Performance; An Econometric Evaluation," IMF Working Papers 08/176, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Kotaro Ishi & Kenji Fujita & Mark R. Stone, 2011. "Should Unconventional Balance Sheet Policies Be Added to the Central Bank toolkit? a Review of the Experience so Far," IMF Working Papers 11/145, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Julien Pinter, 2017. "Central bank financial strength and inflation: an empirical reassessment considering the key role of the fiscal support," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17055, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    4. Igor Goncharov & Vasso Ioannidou & Martin C. Schmalz, 2017. "(Why) Do Central Banks Care About Their Profits?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6546, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Schwarz Claudia & Karakitsos Polychronis & Merriman Niall & Studener Werner, 2015. "Why Accounting Matters: A Central Bank Perspective," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-42, March.
    6. Peter Howells, 2009. "Independent Central Banks: Some theoretical and empirical problems?," Working Papers 0908, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Perera, Anil & Ralston, Deborah & Wickramanayake, Jayasinghe, 2013. "Central bank financial strength and inflation: Is there a robust link?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 399-414.
    8. Chan-Guk Huh & Jie Wu, 2015. "Linkage between US monetary policy and emerging economies: the case of Korea?s financial market and monetary policy," International Journal of Economic Sciences, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 4(3), pages 1-18, September.
    9. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:5:p:990-998 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Chan-Guk Huh, 2015. "Normalization of unconventional US monetary policy and its implications: Korea?s monetary policy case," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 2504115, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    11. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, November.
    12. Luis Ignacio Jácome, 2008. "Central Bank Involvement in Banking Crises in Latin America," IMF Working Papers 08/135, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Andre Meier, 2009. "Panacea, Curse, or Nonevent? Unconventional Monetary Policy in the United Kingdom," IMF Working Papers 09/163, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Cavallo, Michele & Del Negro, Marco & Frame, W. Scott & Grasing, Jamie & Malin, Benjamin A. & Rosa, Carlo, 2018. "Fiscal implications of the Federal Reserve's balance sheet normalization," Staff Reports 833, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central banks; Financial statements; Fiscal stability; Fiscal policy; Inflation; Transparency; Central bank; monetary fund; monetary authorities;

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