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Remittances and Institutions; Are Remittances a Curse?

  • Jihad Dagher
  • Ralph Chami
  • Peter Montiel
  • Yasser Abdih

This paper addresses the complex and overlooked relationship between the receipt of workers'' remittances and institutional quality in the recipient country. Using a simple model, we show how an increase in remittance inflows can lead to deterioration of institutional quality - specifically, to an increase in the share of funds diverted by the government for its own purposes. Empirical testing of this proposition is complicated by the likelihood of reverse causality. In a cross section of 111 countries we document a negative impact of the ratio of remittance inflows to GDP on domestic institutional quality, even after controlling for potential reverse causality. We find that a higher ratio of remittances to GDP is associated with lower indices of control of corruption, government effectiveness, and rule of law.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 08/29.

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Length: 31
Date of creation: 01 Feb 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/29
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