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One-Size-Fits-One; Tailor-Made Fiscal Responses to Capital Flows

  • Daria Zakharova
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    This paper surveys policy responses in recent years to capital inflows in a diverse group of countries that are represented by the Netherlands at the IMF Executive Board. Based on the findings from cross-country empirical literature, the paper distills some guiding principles for policy responses to excessive capital inflows, depending on country-specific circumstances and with a particular focus on fiscal policy. In addition to considering the conventional macroeconomic and structural policy tools, the paper also discusses the role of microfiscal policies in affecting the size and the composition of capital inflows. While conditions in these countries have changed very recently, the policy principles remain salient.

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    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 08/269.

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    Length: 27
    Date of creation: 01 Dec 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/269
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    1. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo, 2000. "When Capital Inflows Come to a Sudden Stop: Consequences and Policy Options," MPRA Paper 6982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart & Carlos A. Végh, 2005. "When It Rains, It Pours: Procyclical Capital Flows and Macroeconomic Policies," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2004, Volume 19, pages 11-82 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Reinhart, Carmen & Montiel, Peter, 2001. "The Dynamics of Capital Movements to Emerging Economies During the 1990s," MPRA Paper 7577, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Paolo Mauro & Törbjörn I. Becker & Jonathan David Ostry & Romain Ranciere & Olivier Jeanne, 2007. "Country Insurance; The Role of Domestic Policies," IMF Occasional Papers 254, International Monetary Fund.
    5. David Hauner, 2006. "A Fiscal Price Tag for International Reserves," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 169-195, 08.
    6. Cottarelli, Carlo & Dell'Ariccia, Giovanni & Vladkova-Hollar, Ivanna, 2005. "Early birds, late risers, and sleeping beauties: Bank credit growth to the private sector in Central and Eastern Europe and in the Balkans," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 83-104, January.
    7. Sebastian Edwards, 2000. "Capital Flows, Real Exchange Rates, and Capital Controls: Some Latin American Experiences," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Flows and the Emerging Economies: Theory, Evidence, and Controversies, pages 197-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Leslie Lipschitz & Alex Mourmouras & Timothy D. Lane, 2002. "Capital Flows to Transition Economies; Master or Servant," IMF Working Papers 02/11, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Philip R. Lane & Roberto Perotti, 2001. "The Importance of Composition of Fiscal Policy: Evidence from Different Exchange Rate Regimes," Trinity Economics Papers 200116, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    10. Jesmin Rahman, 2008. "Current Account Developments in New Member States of the European Union; Equilibrium, Excess, and EU-Phoria," IMF Working Papers 08/92, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Michael Keen & Murtaza H. Syed, 2006. "Domestic Taxes and International Trade; Some Evidence," IMF Working Papers 06/47, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Peter S. Heller, 1997. "Fiscal Policy Management in an Open Capital Regime," IMF Working Papers 97/20, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Bikas Joshi & Manuela Goretti & Uma Ramakrishnan & Alun H. Thomas & Atish R. Ghosh & Juan Zalduendo, 2008. "Capital Inflows and Balance of Payments Pressures; Tailoring Policy Responses in Emerging Market Economies," IMF Policy Discussion Papers 08/2, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Guillermo A. Calvo, 2003. "Explaining Sudden Stops, Growth Collapse and BOP Crises: The Case of Distortionary Output Taxes," NBER Working Papers 9864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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