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Investigating Inflation Dynamics in Sudan

  • Kenji Moriyama
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    This paper investigates inflation dynamics in Sudan using three different approaches: the single equation model, the structural vector-auto regression model and a vector error correction model. This is the first study in a low-income and a post-conflict country that uses these three separate techniques to understand inflation dynamics. The use of these approaches is particularly useful to check the robustness of the estimated parameters in the model for a country with limited data coverage and possible structural breaks. The estimated results suggest that money supply growth and nominal exchange rate changes affect inflation with 18-24 months time lag.

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    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 08/189.

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    Length: 22
    Date of creation: 01 Jul 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/189
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    1. J. McCarthy, 1999. "Pass-through of exchange rates and import prices to domestic inflation in some industrialised economies," BIS Working Papers 79, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Alexei Kireyev, 2001. "Financial Reforms in Sudan; Streamlining Bank Intermediation," IMF Working Papers 01/53, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Régis Barnichon & Shanaka J. Peiris, 2008. "Sources of Inflation in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(5), pages 729-746, November.
    4. Marco Rossi & Daniel Leigh, 2002. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Turkey," IMF Working Papers 02/204, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Darrel Cohen & Kevin Hassett & R. Glenn Hubbard, 1999. "Inflation and the User Cost of Capital: Does Inflation Still Matter?," NBER Chapters, in: The Costs and Benefits of Price Stability, pages 199-234 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Rodolphe Blavy, 2004. "Inflation and Monetary Pass-Through in Guinea," IMF Working Papers 04/223, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Nikolay Gueorguiev, 2003. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Romania," IMF Working Papers 03/130, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Nkunde Mwase, 2006. "An Empirical Investigation of the Exchange Rate Pass-Through to Inflation in Tanzania," IMF Working Papers 06/150, International Monetary Fund.
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